Sunday, August 23, 2015

“Partial Journalism?”/ “Solutions Journalism?”: THE PLOT SICKENS


4LAKids: Sunday 23•Aug•2015
In This Issue:
 •  Education Matters: L.A. TIMES ANNOUNCES WEEKLY EDUCATION NEWSLETTER …what a concept!
 •  BILLIONAIRES FUND EDUCATION NEWS AT LA TIMES
 •  Back2School@LAUSD: A SMOOTH START …AND NOW THE HARD WORK BEGINS
 •  Eric Garcetti: HERE’S HOW CITY HALL IS HELPING LOS ANGELES STUDENTS SUCCEED
 •  HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS & THE NEWS THAT DOESN'T FIT: The Rest (but not necessarily the best) of the Stories from Other Sources
 •  EVENTS: Coming up next week...
 •  What can YOU do?


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 •  4LAKidsNews: a compendium of recent items of interest - news stories, scurrilous rumors, links, academic papers, rants and amusing anecdotes, etc.
Before I go into my rant: Congratulations to everyone in LAUSD, from the superintendent to the transitional kindergartener – and all the folks in between – who got the new school year up and running so well and seemingly seamlessly.

I know it wasn’t easy …making it look effortless never is!


YOU HAVE TO EXCUSE ME, MY PARANOIA IS SHOWING. Maybe it’s the chemotherapy?

The headlines say it all: MAJOR CHARTER SCHOOL EXPANSION IN THE WORKS FOR L.A. UNIFIED STUDENTS - http://lat.ms/1OXmr0m (published last week in 4LAkids] and a letter this week from the publisher of the Los Angeles Times: A RENEWED EMPHASIS ON EDUCATION AT THE TIMES [below + http://lat.ms/1gUrnIg] While Times publisher Austin Beutner claims “independent journalism” is the lofty goal, he lays out just who’s paying for all the “independence”: Broad and Gates and Wasserman and The Waltons …oh my.

Diane Ravitch’s lead is: BILLIONAIRES FUND EDUCATION NEWS AT LA TIMES: “Just when you thought it couldn’t get worse, you read a story like this.” [below] Diane goes on to note that the LA Times “Education Matters” initiative kicks off with an Op-Ed from Arne Duncan (follows): “Now there’s a fresh perspective!”

A 4LAKids correspondent emails: “The LA Times is myopic. Howard Blume, who I think is a really nice guy, has been on KCRW twice in the last two days. As usual, he made everything into a conflict between UTLA and the school district as if no one else has an interest in public education and might be impacting things.”

●●smf’s 2¢: With the influx of ®eform, Inc. ¢a$h I’m afraid the LA Times has moved from myopic to monoptic.

● Sunday's LA Times features a full-page ad of Beutner's letter on the back page section one; "Education Matters: Get Some Today!"
● Los Angeles will be subjected to an avalanche of media on the visionary civic-booster wonderfulness of Eli Broad in the months ahead because of the opening of his Art Museum - Sunday's Times' front page features a profile of Eyde Broad. The question is whether being a land developer/insurance billionaire/art collector qualifies one as an expert on public education.

Robin Lithgow, retired Director of the LAUSD Arts Education Branch writes to The Times:

“Considering the foundations supporting this effort it's unlikely you will take my suggestions seriously, but there is one thing you could do to gain credibility with the education community.

“The Los Angeles Times could do a serious investigation of the 50-year history of the corporate ‘education reform’ agenda. I wish I still had the John Birch Society pamphlet that I read in 1968 which called for the abolition of public education. At the time I read it I thought it was just crack-pot ideology, but I've spent 50 years as a public school teacher and administrator and have watched wave after wave of ‘reform’ efforts through the lens of that pamphlet.

“The Los Angeles Times has a lot to answer for when you consider the decades of attacks that have resulted in a gradual erosion of the public's confidence in and support of our schools and our educators. It has aligned itself with the same forces that support the arch-conservative American Legislative Exchange Commission (ALEC). It has been ruthlessly anti-union. It has supported the initiatives of the Waltons, the Gates, the Broads, all of them standing to profit from their "reform" agenda. Why should we trust you now?

“Bottomless pockets are not an indicator of wisdom when it comes to the public education of all of our children. It is the successful veteran educators you should be listening to.”


ROBIN, I’M LOOKING FOR THAT PAMPHLET TOO! In 1960, (John Birch Society Founder Robert) Welch advised JBS members to “join your local PTA [Parent Teachers Association] at the beginning of the school year, get your conservative friends to do likewise, and go to work to take it over. | http://bit.ly/1E4IAd3

Bob Dylan wrote a song: Talkin' John Birch Paranoid Blues. CBS censors wouldn’t let him sing it on the Ed Sullivan Show. “I explained the situation to Bob and asked him if he wanted to do something else,” recalls Ed Sullivan Show producer Bob Precht, “and Bob, quite appropriately, said ‘No, this is what I want to do. If I can’t play my song, I’d rather not appear on the show.'” | http://bit.ly/1K76eGv
Well, I was feelin’ sad and feelin’ blue
I didn’t know what in the world I wus gonna do
Them Communists they wus comin’ around
They wus in the air
They wus on the ground
They wouldn’t gimme no peace . . .

So I run down most hurriedly
And joined up with the John Birch Society
I got me a secret membership card
And started off a-walkin’ down the road
Yee-hoo, I’m a real John Bircher now!
Look out you Commies!

The song’s too long for 4LAKids and too controversial for CBS, but it’s worth a listen: http://bit.ly/1LlEsYz

FYI: The Koch Brothers’ father was a founding JBS member; the current Kochs are former members. Hippies that they are, they were opposed to the Vietnam War (It was ‘too expensive’) which was Birch apostasy.

Of course, The School ®eform, Inc. crowd aren’t communists. They are capitalists. What could possibly go wrong?

::

From Wikipedia: http://bit.ly/1NvLGZz:
“IT WAS REVEALED IN 1999 THAT A REVENUE-SHARING ARRANGEMENT WAS IN PLACE BETWEEN THE TIMES AND STAPLES CENTER in the preparation of a 168-page magazine about the opening of the sports arena. (Staples is owned by Anschutz Entertainment Group, politically to the right of Genghis Khan with an enlightened education policy that made AEG producers of the film: “Bad Teacher”) The magazine's editors and writers were not informed of the agreement, which breached the Chinese wall that traditionally has separated advertising from journalistic functions at American newspapers. Times parent company CEO Mark Willes also had not prevented advertisers from pressuring reporters in other sections of the newspaper to write stories favorable to their point of view.”[ http://bit.ly/1gXWCCe].

From The LA Times Ethical Guidelines: "Staff members may not enter into business or financial relationships with their sources. Similarly, staff members may not cover individuals or institutions with which they have a financial relationship."

Q: Is the publisher a staff member?
A: When all the fallout fell, Kathryn Downing, the publisher at the Times at the time of the Staples magazine brouhaha (a lawyer with no newspaper experience) was quickly removed. [http://bit.ly/1JmVoas ]

The “Chinese Wall” has been breached, dear friends - the gap filled-up with pictures of dead presidents. The difference between this “pay-to-play” and that one is that we – and The Times journalism+editorial staff – have been informed of it.

As if we+they didn’t know all along.

::

BUT “EDUCATION MATTERS” IS NOT UNIQUE
► ABOUT EDUCATION LAB | The Seattle Times | Originally published March 24, 2015 at 10:59 am By Caitlin Moran Community engagement editor | http://bit.ly/1PA8E0y

“Education Lab is a Seattle Times project that spotlights promising approaches to some of the most persistent challenges in public education. It is produced in partnership with the Solutions Journalism Network, a New York-based nonprofit that works to spread the practice of solutions-oriented journalism, and funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

“Since the project launched in October 2013, Seattle Times reporters have published dozens of stories identifying and assessing promising programs and innovations — both locally and around the country — to problems that have long bedeviled schools.

“Engaging with our readers — and reaching education stakeholders who are not regular Seattle Times readers — has been a focus of Education Lab from day one. Since launch, we’ve held several community meetings with parents, students, teachers and education advocates to gather ideas and input. We’ve experimented with new ways to feature community voices, including live chats, reader questionnaires and regular guest columns. We’ve also held four large-scale public events – with more in the planning stages. Our goal is to create a new conversation that connects teachers, parents, students and others around innovation in schools.”

Education Lab. Education Matters. Deja vu²

….and if that’s not enough you can always worry about this timely trend: TWO “PUFF PIECE” STORIES ABOUT PEARSON EDUCATION FROM NPR…. [bit.ly/1KAYWGS]


Lenin wrote at length about controlling the press; his “truth” became “Izvestia”- the newspaper of the Soviet government, and Pravda (“news”) the newspaper of the Communist Party. Goebbels perfected The Big Lie; Vance Packard and Marshall McLuhan conflated the psychology+the philosophy+the message+the media. Karl Rove made political news management into an art form. Fox News is “Fair+Balanced”; so is MSNBC. Television is reality. My favorite writer on the subject is Jerry Della Femina …but my background is in the show-biz wonderland where Hollywood met MadMen and the money+martinis flowed like money+martinis. If the sex+drugs didn’t get you the coffee+doughnuts would.

Fasten your seat belts, it’s going to be a bumpy ride.

¡Onward/Adelante! - smf



PS: It an old saw, but it still cuts: By the numbers: HOW TO TELL IF YOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT IS INFECTED BY THE BROAD VIRUS [http://bit.ly/ByTheNos]

#39. Local newspaper fails to report on much of this.
#40. Local newspaper never mentions the words “Broad Foundation.”
#41.Broad and Gates Foundations give money to local public radio stations which in turn become strangely silent about the presence and influence of the Broad and Gates Foundation in your school district.

PS2:
In Friday’s Federal Register there is a notification from the US Dept. of Ed: APPLICATIONS FOR NEW AWARDS: CHARTER SCHOOLS PROGRAM: Grants to Non-State Educational Agency Eligible Applicants for Planning, Program Design, and Initial Implementation and for Dissemination [http://1.usa.gov/1LpOPKL] They’re from the government; they’re here to help!


Education Matters: L.A. TIMES ANNOUNCES WEEKLY EDUCATION NEWSLETTER …what a concept!
Austin Beutner: A RENEWED EMPHASIS ON EDUCATION AT THE TIMES
A letter from the publisher of the Los Angeles Times | http://lat.ms/1gUrnIg

18 Aug 2015

Dear Reader,

Today is the first day of school for hundreds of thousands of children throughout Los Angeles, and for students, teachers and parents, the occasion is cause for both excitement and trepidation.

Education, it has been said, is the soul of society, and few institutions embody our hopes and dreams as much as our public schools. They are the cornerstones of our communities and the foundation for our future, where children from all backgrounds are given the tools to shape their lives and their world.

With the start of a new school year, the Los Angeles Times is rededicating itself to coverage of teaching and learning. Our goal is to provide an ongoing, wide-ranging report card on K-12 education in Los Angeles, California and the nation.

We are calling our initiative Education Matters, and I encourage you to join us as we explore the issues that matter most to you and your child. If you want to understand the latest debate on curriculum or testing, find out about the role of student health in learning, study how charter schools are changing public education or experience a classroom from the perspective of a teacher, then Education Matters will be an essential destination.
“The California Endowment, the Wasserman Foundation and the Baxter Family Foundation … are providing funds to support Education Matters. The California Community Foundation and United Way of Greater Los Angeles have also supported this effort with grants from the The Broad Foundation. These institutions, like The Times, are dedicated to independent journalism that engages and informs its readers.”

●● smf's 2¢: Wasserman… Baxter… UWofGLA… Broad…? This calls for a very interesting interpretation of “independent journalism”.

With an expanded team of reporters, we will take a fresh approach to our news and analysis starting with today’s stories about the unique challenges facing LAUSD and the last year-round school in Los Angeles. Our editorial pages feature a guest column by U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan on the need for more investment in math and science education. You will find our reports at latimes.com/schools in English and Spanish.

In the coming months, we will convene public forums to address topics such as educational education policy, saving for college and talking to your child’s teacher. We intend these conversations to be both thoughtful and practical.

The Times continues to draw more high school students to journalism with HS Insider, available at highschool.latimes.com. And as the school year begins, more college students will receive free access to The Times through our College Connection program, which brings them news and information relevant to their studies and their communities.

A child’s success in the classroom depends on the participation and support of everyone in the community, a view shared by the California Endowment, the Wasserman Foundation and the Baxter Family Foundation, which are providing funds to support Education Matters. The California Community Foundation and United Way of Greater Los Angeles have also supported this effort with grants from the The Broad Foundation. These institutions, like The Times, are dedicated to independent journalism that engages and informs its readers.

Your first assignment is to become involved. Read and share our stories. Attend a discussion in your neighborhood. Sign up for our weekly newsletter, “Education Matters.” Follow us on Twitter at @LATEducation.

As we launch Education Matters, I look forward to hearing from you. Please let me know how we’re doing and how we can best serve your needs.


Austin Beutner,
Publisher and CEO, Los Angeles Times


Also see: ELI BROAD & CHARTER EXPANSION; AUSTIN BEUTNER & EDUCATION MATTERS



BILLIONAIRES FUND EDUCATION NEWS AT LA TIMES

By Diane Ravitch, from her blog | http://bit.ly/1Jrzw43

August 18, 2015 :: Just when you thought it couldn’t get worse, you read a story like this.

It is a letter from the publisher of the Los Angeles Times informing readers that a group of wealthy foundations are underwriting expanded coverage of education. Not surprising to see the Eli Broad Foundation in the mix. Former Mayor Richard Riordan is not listed but you can be sure he is involved.

These control freaks–er, philanthropists–worry that the LAT has not provided enough space to cover this vital topic.

Publisher Austin Beutner writes:

“We are calling our initiative Education Matters, and I encourage you to join us as we explore the issues that matter most to you and your child. If you want to understand the latest debate on curriculum or testing, find out about the role of student health in learning, study how charter schools are changing public education or experience a classroom from the perspective of a teacher, then Education Matters will be an essential destination.

“With an expanded team of reporters, we will take a fresh approach to our news and analysis starting with today’s stories about the unique challenges facing LAUSD and the last year-round school in Los Angeles. Our editorial pages feature a guest column by U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan on the need for more investment in math and science education. You will find our reports at latimes.com/schools in English and Spanish.

“In the coming months, we will convene public forums to address topics such as educational education policy, saving for college and talking to your child’s teacher. We intend these conversations to be both thoughtful and practical.”

A guest column by Arne Duncan! Now there’s a fresh perspective!

I wonder if I will ever be invited to write for the LA Times again?



● What Diane says about Diane: I am a historian of education and Research Professor of Education at New York University.
I was born in Houston, Texas, attended the Houston public schools from kindergarten through high school, and graduated from Wellesley College in 1960. I received my Ph.D. in the history of American education in 1975.
I am the mother of two sons. They went to private schools in New York City. I have four grandsons: two went to religious schools, the third goes to public school in New York City, and the fourth will go to the same wonderful public school in Brooklyn.
I live in Brooklyn, New York.
● More from Wikipedia: She was appointed to public office by Presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton. She served as Assistant Secretary of Education under Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander from 1991 to 1993 and his successor Richard Riley appointed her to serve as a member of the National Assessment Governing Board, which supervises the National Assessment of Educational Progress; she was a member of NAGB from 1997 to 2004. From 1995 to 2005 she held the Brown Chair in Education Studies at the Brookings Institution[


Back2School@LAUSD: A SMOOTH START …AND NOW THE HARD WORK BEGINS
By Howard Blume and Sonali Kohli |LA Times | http://lat.ms/1J3CXup

• Los Angeles, the second largest school district in the nation, went back to school Aug. 18. Here’s the district by the numbers: lat.ms/1LrhnDR (Warning: opens endless stream of Times videos!)

19 August 2015 :: Everyone, it seems, has an opinion about L.A. Unified.

Some critics consider the mammoth school system so hopeless that they are trying to dismantle it. Others say it's too late.

For the opening of school Tuesday, L.A. Unified presented itself as thriving, reviving and vital. In events stretched throughout the day, officials showcased some of its best.

El Sereno Middle School offers classes in Mandarin for its mostly Latino students and hosts a program with USC to pay tuition for those who graduate from high school.

"He speaks three languages," Irma Henriquez said proudly of her son, Nelson, 13. "Imagine how many doors will open to him in the future."

At Vine Street Elementary in Hollywood, parents got the chance to question school board President Steve Zimmer and even complain about a few things.

Liliana Rodriguez said he needs to do something about the cafeteria lunches.

"My kids don't like to eat at school very often because the foods are frozen," Rodriguez said.

New Principal Kurt Lowry was determined to be responsive. He put in a call to food services about the frozen or undercooked meals. And he made a radio call to custodians when he was alerted that there was no soap in the preschoolers' bathroom.

The district even took the media into its command center for the online student records system that failed last year, leaving schools in chaos with students unable to get into classes.

That program, called My Integrated Student Information System, or MISIS, appeared to work Tuesday. Fixing it cost $133 million. An additional $80 million was set aside for this year.

"The district is in a renaissance," said L.A. schools Supt. Ramon C. Cortines, who took over the top job last fall. "A year ago, the opening of school was a disaster. And I believed it could be fixed.... It's my hope that [parents] are willing to say: 'Hey, maybe we can trust the district again.' "

The new year finds the 650,000-student L.A. Unified School District at a crossroads. Increased funding has restored staff and programs that were lost during the recession; long-awaited salary increases have improved labor relations and polarizing Supt. John Deasy resigned under pressure.

Cortines, 83, returned from retirement with a pragmatic focus: fixing the records system and charting a path forward on technology after a disastrous, now-abandoned effort to provide iPads to every student, teacher and campus administrator.

But higher state funding isn't keeping up with claims on it. Many adult school teachers were laid off and some question whether the district can afford the pay raises.

At Jefferson High School south of downtown Tuesday, the big story was the absence of a big story.

The faulty records system generated inaccurate transcripts and miscalculated grade-point averages, among other problems.

Justin Fernandez, a junior, said the focus on Jefferson has benefited the school.

"They've put kids in the right places," he said. "I haven't seen no one with mistakes in their schedule. And the school is getting lots of attention."

Principal Jack Foote had been prepared for the worst, with printouts of rosters and attendance sheets if, for example, the city of Los Angeles suffered a major power outage.

There were minor glitches. Eleventh-grader Miguel Figueroa said he need a more advanced Spanish class than the one he received. Another student said he wanted ROTC as an elective but it wasn't on his schedule.

3Overall, the system functioned as it should. "It's no longer that it doesn't work or 'I wish I could take attendance,' or, 'I wish I knew how many students I had in my class,'" said history teacher Katherine Harrison.

The district highlighted Cleveland High School in the west San Fernando Valley, where the humanities magnet sends students to some of the best colleges in the country.

At 186th Street Elementary in Gardena, teaching veteran Lisa Harmison oversaw organized chaos. The pre-kindergarten class of 24 was split into groups, each assigned a color, and rotated between stations.

At one, children used blocks in free play, sitting on a mat with the alphabet on it, learning to play together to build social skills. In a second, students worked independently, gluing together pre-cut pieces of paper to make an owl, the school mascot. The goal was to learn how to follow directions.

At a third table, pupils matched colored pieces to the shapes on paper, a math-related exercise.

"Patterning in preschool is big," said Dean Tagawa, a senior administrator. It lays the foundation for math concepts later on, he said.

Some of the 4- and 5-year olds were in a classroom setting for the first time, and it showed — Harmison constantly directed them back into their groups. She pulled one out of the play kitchen, built out of wood, sending him to the library area.

One of her biggest concerns in the so-called transitional kindergarten is the length of the day: there isn't time for napping.

L.A. Unified's public relations efforts aren't likely to sway some civic leaders and philanthropists who have lost faith in the system. A group led by the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation* is seeking to rapidly expand the number of independently operated charter schools, which could shrink a school system already dealing with declining enrollment.

Jefferson history teacher Susan Ferguson said it would be wrong to give up on schools such as hers and the students who depend on it.

Even though the scheduling problems led to student protests, she said, "the kids wanted to come back here. They wanted their classes. They want an education. They want the best for themselves and they deserve it."

* …which underwrites LA Times education coverage…


Eric Garcetti: HERE’S HOW CITY HALL IS HELPING LOS ANGELES STUDENTS SUCCEED
OpEd in the LA Daily News By Mayor Eric Garcetti | bit.ly/1TRLmt9

08/17/15, 4:47 PM PDT | Do you remember your first day of school? The thrill of seeing friends, the sense of possibility for the year ahead.

That moment arrives Tuesday for 640,000 students in the Los Angeles Unified School District. But when they step into the classroom, the rubber will meet the road — excitement vs. reality. As city leaders, it is our job to give those students the education they deserve. But there is one truth that parents and educators know well: A good education is not restricted to what happens between the first and last bell. Equally important is giving students the right start to their morning and helping them after school.

That’s where City Hall comes in: We can ensure kids have safe streets, after school programs, and healthy meals to make academic success easier to achieve.

A sense of safety is integral to kids’ ability to learn. That’s why we’ve invested in programs like Safe Routes to School, and increased funding by $5.5 million for our office of Gang Reduction and Youth Development (GRYD), which funds programs like Summer Night Lights. SNL provides safe recreation options at dozens of parks by keeping the lights on later. Along the way, we’re able to reduce crime and give young people a place to learn and play.

But the need for this program doesn’t end when the school year begins. So this fall, for the first time, we will start “Friday Night Lights” at eight select parks.

What happens when these students get back home?

As research shows, family income is a leading indicator of academic success. Nationwide, only 9 percent of students raised in poverty will receive a college degree by age 24. The correlation between low wages and low graduation rates is heartbreaking and direct. We must level this playing field with programs and economic opportunity.

That’s why we fought for and won the largest anti-poverty measure in the history of L.A. — an increase in the minimum wage to $15 by 2020. By giving L.A. a raise, we are going to lift 600,000 people out of poverty.

As we take these steps, we’re making sure young people aren’t left behind. This is where Hire L.A.’s Youth comes in. It’s a program linking young people to summer jobs and mentorship. Over the last two years we have more than doubled the size of this critical program from 5,000 jobs to over 11,000. That helps put our young people on a path toward career readiness.

We’re also adopting some common-sense strategies to link LAUSD students to resources.

The first is our Student Dropout Recovery Program. This partnership between the school district and the city reduces absenteeism and get students re-engaged in the learning process. So far, this program has helped get 1,000 young people back into school.

Another initiative of mine will provide every student in Los Angeles with a library card. That simple step will give students access to one-on-one tutoring and live homework help. A third initiative will expand the students served a good, healthy dinner at school. We’re in the process of more than doubling that program from 75,000 students served per day in 2015 to 150,000 by 2017. After that, it will go district-wide.

None of these programs are comprehensive solutions. Internet access can’t replace a great teacher, and engaged parents will always be more important than summer jobs. What I’ve set out to do is work with educators and families to increase the possibility that our students succeed.

Because, nothing’s more important than helping the next generation of Angelenos realize their potential.



●●smf’s 2¢: Thank you Eric. In the end it’s what we learned (or were supposed to learn) in kindergarten about working together; about shared goals and working together – not about disruption.


HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS & THE NEWS THAT DOESN'T FIT: The Rest (but not necessarily the best) of the Stories from Other Sources
WHY SO MANY TEACHERS QUIT AND HOW TO FIX THAT - Education Matters/LA Times
http://lat.ms/1KEAIeU

IS THERE STILL ROOM FOR PLAY IN CALIFORNIA KINDERGARTENS? | The California Report | KQED News
http://bit.ly/1WLm3Yt

IT'S TRUE: KINDERGARTEN IS OPTIONAL IN CALIFORNIA! http://lat.ms/1LpRc0h

CAHSEE: STATE ASSEMBLY PASSES EXIT EXAM WAIVER, BILL HEADING TO SENATE
http://bit.ly/1fwTOLe

ELI BROAD & CHARTER EXPANSION; AUSTIN BEUTNER & EDUCATION MATTERS http://bit.ly/1MJbLVP

Just sayin’: TWO “PUFF PIECE” STORIES ABOUT PEARSON EDUCATION FROM NPR….
http://bit.ly/1KAYWGS

Updated: JEB BUSH’S EMBRACE OF COMMON CORE IS A CAMPAIGN LIGHTNING ROD ...or not
http://bit.ly/1fwMKP1

MiSiS HELD UP FOR LA UNIFIED OPENING, BUT FUTURE SNAGS EXPECTED http://bit.ly/1LpJnri

JEB BUSH’S EMBRACE OF COMMON CORE IS A CAMPAIGN LIGHTNING ROD http://bit.ly/1fwMKP1

SCHOOL DISTRICTS EXPERIMENT WITH TAKE-HOME INTERNET ACCESS http://bit.ly/1PqNp0v

Diane Ravitch: BILLIONAIRES FUND EDUCATION NEWS AT LA TIMES
http://bit.ly/1NlXHBy

THE CAHSEE DEBACLE (2 stories) “By the power vested in me, and a waiver from the legislature, I hereby award you…”

THE CAHSEE DEBACLE (2 stories) “By the power vested in me, and a waiver from the legislature, I hereby award you…”
http://bit.ly/1K5PSxT

Back2School@LAUSD:/Day 2: A SMOOTH START …AND NOW THE HARD WORK BEGINS
http://bit.ly/1JqPsU1

ZIMMER, BOARD MEMBERS OPEN THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL ACROSS DISTRICT
http://bit.ly/1TRNLyA

Mayor Eric Garcetti: HERE’S HOW CITY HALL IS HELPING LOS ANGELES STUDENTS SUCCEED
http://bit.ly/1TRLmt9

TEACHER BACK-TO-SCHOOL SUPPLIES ADD UP FOR CLASSES LIKE MUSIC
http://bit.ly/1MwF4JD

FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL FOR LAUSD INCLUDES CONCERNS OVER MISIS, VACCINATIONS
http://bit.ly/1EAAuDs

Back2School@LAUSD: ARNE DUNCAN TELLS CALIFORNIA SCHOOLS WHERE THEY NEED TO PUT THEIR MONEY

Back2School@LAUSD: L.A. TIMES ANNOUNCES WEEKLY EDUCATION NEWSLETTER …what a concept!
http://bit.ly/1MB2hMh

Back2School@LAUSD: HOW BIG ARE HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES IN L.A.? An LA Times survey
http://bit.ly/1WCwMoa

Back2School@LAUSD: THESE LAUSD STUDENTS ARE NOT HEADING BACK TO SCHOOL
http://bit.ly/1WCuGor

Back2School@LAUSD: L.A. UNIFIED LOOKS FOR SMOOTHER START-UP THIS YEAR http://bit.ly/1Ku5OpF


EVENTS: Coming up next week...
NEXT SUNDAY:
REGULAR BOARD MEETING - SUNDAY, AUGUST 30, 2015 - NOT AT DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS - TIME TO BE DETERMINED | http://bit.ly/1hRTWHc
Start: 08/30/2015 10:30 am

*Dates and times subject to change. ________________________________________
• SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION BOND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE:
http://www.laschools.org/bond/
Phone: 213-241-5183
____________________________________________________
• LAUSD FACILITIES COMMUNITY OUTREACH CALENDAR:
http://www.laschools.org/happenings/
Phone: 213-241.8700


• LAUSD BOARD OF EDUCATION & COMMITTEES MEETING CALENDAR



What can YOU do?
• E-mail, call or write your school board member:
Scott.Schmerelson@lausd.net • 213-241-8333
Monica.Garcia@lausd.net • 213-241-6180
Ref.Rodriguez@lausd.net • 213-241-5555
George.McKenna@lausd.net • 213-241-6382
Monica.Ratliff@lausd.net • 213-241-6388
Richard.Vladovic@lausd.net • 213-241-6385
Steve.Zimmer@lausd.net • 213-241-6387
...or your city councilperson, mayor, county supervisor, state legislator, the governor, member of congress, senator - or the president. Tell them what you really think! • Find your state legislator based on your home address. Just go to: http://bit.ly/dqFdq2 • There are 26 mayors and five county supervisors representing jurisdictions within LAUSD, the mayor of LA can be reached at mayor@lacity.org • 213.978.0600
• Call or e-mail Governor Brown: 213-897-0322 e-mail: http://www.govmail.ca.gov/
• Open the dialogue. Write a letter to the editor. Circulate these thoughts. Talk to the principal and teachers at your local school.
• Speak with your friends, neighbors and coworkers. Stay on top of education issues. Don't take my word for it!
• Get involved at your neighborhood school. Join your PTA. Serve on a School Site Council. Be there for a child.
• If you are eligible to become a citizen, BECOME ONE.
• If you a a citizen, REGISTER TO VOTE at http://registertovote.ca.gov/
• If you are registered, VOTE LIKE THE FUTURE DEPENDS ON IT. THEY DO!


Who are your elected federal & state representatives? How do you contact them?




Scott Folsom is a parent leader in LAUSD and was Parent/Volunteer of the Year for 2010-11 for Los Angeles County. • He is Past President of Los Angeles Tenth District PTSA and has represented PTA on the LAUSD Construction Bond Citizen's Oversight Committee for over 12 years. He is Vice President for Health, Legislation Action Committee member and a member of the Board of Directors of the California State PTA. He serves on numerous school district advisory and policy committees and has served as a PTA officer and governance council member at three LAUSD schools. He is the recipient of the UTLA/AFT "WHO" Gold Award and the ACSA Regional Ferd Kiesel Memorial Distinguished Service Award - honors he hopes to someday deserve. • In this forum his opinions are his own and your opinions and feedback are invited. Quoted and/or cited content copyright © the original author and/or publisher. All other material copyright © 4LAKids.
• FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. 4LAKids makes such material available in an effort to advance understanding of education issues vital to parents, teachers, students and community members in a democracy. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.
• To SUBSCRIBE e-mail: 4LAKids-subscribe@topica.email-publisher.com - or -TO ADD YOUR OR ANOTHER'S NAME TO THE 4LAKids SUBSCRIPTION LIST E-mail smfolsom@aol.com with "SUBSCRIBE" AS THE SUBJECT. Thank you.


Sunday, August 16, 2015

3rd time :: The charm



4LAKids: Sunday 16•Aug•2015
In This Issue:
 •  IN ANNUAL SPEECH, CORTINES OFFERS GOOD CHEER BUT (the LA School Report says) LEAVES OUT ANY VISION
 •  CORTINES CALLS FOR UNITY IN ANNUAL L.A. SCHOOL DISTRICT ADDRESS
 •  PUBLIC RELEASE OF CALIFORNIA STUDENTS’ COMPUTERIZED TEST SCORES POSTPONED UNTIL NEXT MONTH
 •  GROUPS FILE FEDERAL COMPLAINT ALLEGING CIVIL RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN CALIFORNIA PHYSICAL EDUCATION
 •  HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS & THE NEWS THAT DOESN'T FIT: The Rest (but not necessarily the best) of the Stories from Other Sources
 •  EVENTS: Coming up next week...
 •  What can YOU do?


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 •  4LAKids Anthology: All the Past Issues, solved, resolved and unsolved!
 •  4LAKidsNews: a compendium of recent items of interest - news stories, scurrilous rumors, links, academic papers, rants and amusing anecdotes, etc.
Ramon Cortines is careful to call the folks who are entitled to the title “Doctor”. And yet insists on being called “Mr. Cortines” – even though he has earned his Ed.D.

At Harvard the convention is to only call medical doctors “Doctor” – so a first year intern is a “Doctor” – and a Nobel laureate physicist isn’t. In the U.K. medical doctors who are members of the Royal College of Surgeons – a great honour - revert to the title “Mister”. Go figure.

I say this because Ray Cortines is a gentleman in the best meaning of the word. I have seen him angry and I understand he is not above making a scene, I have heard he has bandied the well-deserved epithet about. Those familiar with these pages know he is not without his faults.

Still, at 83 he has earned and merits respect. Cortines has Been-There-and Done That; he has filled the unforgiving minute with sixty seconds’ worth of distance run. At half his age I began to realize my tolerance for fools+foolishness began to wane – and as superintendent/chancellor of five school districts – and LAUSD thrice – he has witnessed more than anyone’s share of both. The man has had Rudy Giuliani tell him how to run schools!

There is an apocryphal story of School Board President Caprice Young pleading on her knees for Cortines to stay-on when he left the first time. I believe John Deasy and then Board President Monica Garcia threw him under the bus when the “secret settlement” was disclosed after he left the second thing – yet it was Garcia’s vote and Cortines’ acquiesce (over Deasy’s figuratively dead body) that made the third tenure possible.

Ray Cortines knows what he’s doing.

On Tuesday last he gave a well-delivered and well received Back to School Address (school starts this coming Tuesday) to his administrators – with just right tone of cheerleading and “Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more…”

The Los Angeles School ®eport lambasted the speech as short on policy and goals – missing the intent+point entirely of the objective of a motivational speech.

Shakespeare’s Henry V does not lay out policy+goals to his “Band of Brothers” at the morn of Agincourt. He motivates.

L.A. Times reporter Howard Blume captured the moment, comparing Cortines’ speech to the remarks+theatrics of John Deasy in years past:

“(Cortines’) remarks — like the event itself — contrasted with the eloquent, almost militaristic intensity that Deasy brought to the podium.

(Militaristic intensity: One can almost visualize John L Deasy as George C. Scott as Patton – with the chrome helmet and the ivory-handled pistols; the flag as backdrop. Deasy’s first job in education was teaching science at a military academy in Long Island.)

“Last year, Deasy ordered a sealed envelope taped to every seat. In it was the name of a struggling student; each administrator was supposed to mentor and assist that student. In the furor of Deasy’s last months, this endeavor immediately dropped off. No mention of it was made this year.

“In 2012, Deasy announced his plan to provide a tablet to every student, which quickly evolved into the district’s now-abandoned $1.3-billion iPads-for-all effort.”

The “sealed envelope” was a stunt. That “now abandoned” iPad plan – and its companion MiSiS initiative – I remind us all, was certainly ill-conceived, probably fraudulent and possibly felonious. I daresay the only one in that audience Tuesday who missed John Deasy may have been the LASR reporter.

Cortines told his audience: “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers(+sisters): The iPad Fiasco and the nonexistent Pearson content and the MiSiS Crisis and Blame-the-Teachers/#®eform@AllCosts are behind us ….and the long+hard work of educating children is the agenda+policy for the school year just beginning.”

Maybe that’s not what he said. Maybe it’s just what I heard.


I SPENT MUCH OF THE PAST WEEK in Sacramento at the Back-to-School convening of California State PTA leadership.

That meeting was exceptionally successful+rewarding …albeit a bit challenging to my personal health. Watch this space and the news for parent-centered/parent-driven school-site, school district and state initiatives to promote true Parent, Family and Student Engagement –and exciting new programs to train+empower parents. To goal is bring the “Local Control” of our neighborhood schools home: To the school and to the community-the-school-is-the-center-of.

• Part of school and family life for more than 115 years, PTA is the defining organization for family engagement.
• If your school has a PTA, please join it.
• If it doesn’t, ask why.
• If you want to start one, start here: http://bit.ly/StartPTA. Or send me an email.

As a result of my preoccupation elsewhere this is an abbreviated issue of 4LAKids, for which you may be truly thankful!


PLEASE BE CAREFUL OUT THERE NEXT WEEK AND IN THE MONTHS AHEAD. There will be kids in-and-out of the crosswalks, in-and-out of the School Zones, in-and-out of the passenger doors and the big yellow buses. They will NOT be looking out for you!


¡Onward/Adelante! - smf


IN ANNUAL SPEECH, CORTINES OFFERS GOOD CHEER BUT (the LA School Report says) LEAVES OUT ANY VISION
by Mike Szymanski | LA School Report | http://bit.ly/1P5gfn3

Posted on August 11, 2015 3:34 pm :: In what is likely to be his final major address as LA Unified superintendent, Ramon Cortines delivered a jocular cheerleading speech today that was absent any bold vision of new ideas or new directions for the district.

Focusing on “unity” and “family” for LAUSD, he made no mention of the effort to find a new superintendent, how long he planned to stay in his position, budget issues or any other major challenges facing the district as schools get ready to open on Aug. 18.

Instead, he used the opportunity at Garfield High School to poke fun at himself and others in an amiable light-on-policy speech that had the effect of contrasting his approach and personality to the man he bookended as superintendent, John Deasy.

“Be patient, I’m old,” he laughed when he dropped his papers during the speech. Cortines turned 83 last month. “I’m doing it a little bit different than I used to but you’re used to that.” And, at one point when his microphone went out, he said, “I knew they’d cut me off.”

Cortines discussed some of the same issues he raised in a speech in 2000, such as poor graduation rates. He said he still believes that decentralizing the district and giving more local control “offers the best framework for success for this district.”

He teasingly threatened to read the entire 191-page decentralization plan, but said, “I will summarize it in a short easy phrase: Invest in LAUSD.” And to accentuate the point, he reminded the audience that the letters of LAUSD should stand for: Language, Achieve, Unity, Schools and Determination.

He also used his speech to describe his impressions of some of the school board members sitting in the front row: “I remember going to regular meetings at Dr. (Richard) Vladovic’s field office, a Starbucks in San Pedro,” Cortines said. Then, he noted that Mónica Ratliff was away in Europe and said he remembered her “asking just one more question after we tirelessly answered 20 before.”

He kidded the new board president Steve Zimmer for “meticulously answering every question in detail.” He cited George McKenna for always “conveying his point with poetry and passion” and Mónica García for shouting “Hello people!” when greeting an audience.

He introduced union leaders in the audience and chided the few who were absent, including the UTLA’s president Alex Caputo-Pearl. “They will be in detention in my office,” he said.

Cortines introduced about two dozen people who worked to fix the MiSiS computer system when he took over the district last October with the data system in disrepair. He repeated a line from a district press release of last week, saying, “MiSiS is the heart of this district. After months of tireless repairs, our heart has some new stents, replaced valves, a pacemaker, and reduced cholesterol, and it is pumping much stronger.”

He talked about dividing up the district into smaller districts, saying, “I’ve reorganized the district, and that will be the last time for me.” And he encouraged administrators and teachers to communicate respectfully at all times, and “report improper conduct.”

“There is a handful, and only a handful, of staff who have acted improperly and that simple mistake can take away public trust in the district and cost us millions of dollars,” he said.

Cortines’s friendly manner was apparent before and after the speech, as well, waving to people in the audience, greeting many of them personally, even posing for pictures.

“I feel like a high school principal on the first day of school,” he said.


CORTINES CALLS FOR UNITY IN ANNUAL L.A. SCHOOL DISTRICT ADDRESS
By Howard Blume | LA Times | http://lat.ms/1WikmBH

12 Aug 2015 :: In an upbeat back-to-school speech, Los Angeles Unified Supt. Ramon C. Cortines told administrators Tuesday that the key to boosting student achievement is collaboration and unity among district employees working with parents and students.

The annual address was probably Cortines' last as superintendent, but also his first since the 83-year-old veteran schools chief returned from retirement upon the forced resignation of John Deasy last October. Cortines has said he hopes to leave by year’s end, provided that the Board of Education has selected a successor.

Cortines, who seemed intent on rebuilding morale, said he was not backing away from the urgency of helping struggling students, but he rejected the rhetoric of district critics who refer to failing schools and blame district employees for the system’s shortcomings.

“You are the heroes of this district,” he told a packed auditorium at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles. “You are the ones that make this district great.”

“Even a simple unexpected thank you is something all our people really want to hear,” Cortines said, adding, “I am tired of hearing that some of our schools are failing schools…. Some need support. Even on those campuses, great things are happening every day.”

His remarks — like the event itself — contrasted with the eloquent, almost militaristic intensity that Deasy brought to the podium.

Cortines introduced and commented on each of the seven school board members and every union leader. “Collaboration is extremely important in this district,” he said, “especially with our bargaining units. And because of that, this district has been able to accomplish a lot in the last seven months.”

He called particular attention to a student records system that caused districtwide chaos last fall and that the district has been working hard to salvage.

Cortines also announced a reorganization plan that divides L.A. Unified into six regions, each under a local superintendent with broad autonomy over schools in his or her area. It’s an idea Cortines has tried to make stick each of three times he’s led L.A. Unified.

Newly elected board member Ref Rodriguez, a charter school founder, said in a recent interview that he appreciates what Cortines wants to do.

“Decentralization and local control, pushing decisions down close to the schools and the community — that actually is transformative,” Rodriguez said. “This whole notion is radical for a district this size.”

The annual address is an anticipated event, used at times to launch major initiatives, set out challenges and tout accomplishments.

Last year, Deasy ordered a sealed envelope taped to every seat. In it was the name of a struggling student; each administrator was supposed to mentor and assist that student. In the furor of Deasy’s last months, this endeavor immediately dropped off. No mention of it was made this year.

In 2012, Deasy announced his plan to provide a tablet to every student, which quickly evolved into the district’s now-abandoned $1.3-billion iPads-for-all effort.

This year, Cortines said, students would have individual computers at more than 100 schools. The flip side is that students at close to 900 schools were likely to be sharing.

The superintendent also noted that the district has rushed to purchase up-to-date math textbooks. Originally, math materials were to have been provided on the iPads.

Cortines frequently served as humorist in chief. When the teachers union leader was not present to be introduced, Cortines said he would be put in detention.

When he asked board members to stand, he ad-libbed: “It’s wonderful to be able to give orders to a Board of Education.”

He also warned them away the next time they needed a superintendent: “I want you to know I’ve changed my phone number. So don’t ever call again.”


PUBLIC RELEASE OF CALIFORNIA STUDENTS’ COMPUTERIZED TEST SCORES POSTPONED UNTIL NEXT MONTH
Mary Plummer | kpcc 89.3 | http://bit.ly/1UBTavO

August 10, 2015 | 05:00 PM :: Those in the public hoping to see the results of new online tests taken by California public school students earlier this year will need to wait a bit longer.

A spokeswoman for the California Department of Education said Monday that the date for a general release of the scores has been edged back to the first of week September — at the earliest.

Department officials had previously said they expected to release results to the public in August.

Parents, however, are still scheduled to receive reports on their individual student's scores this month.

Department spokeswoman Pam Slater says the new public release is not so much a delay as a change taken in an abundance of caution.

“It’s kind of a new era for us," Slater said. "We’re still collecting the data.”

In an email, she added:

The department wants to ensure as many scores as possible are included in the public reporting of results. Additionally, the department will be launching a new Web site to display the results and needs sufficient time to test the new site.

This is the first time the state has tried to wrangle official statewide data for the computerized tests.

The exams were designed to measure how well students understand the new Common Core learning standards for language arts and math. Problems were devised to measure skills in critical thinking and problem-solving, among other concepts.

Students who took the test, called the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) or Smarter Balanced exams, attended grades three to eight and grade 11. About 3 million students statewide were assessed.

Mark Ellis, a professor of secondary education at Cal State Fullerton who works with teachers in Orange County and focuses on math education, said the previous testing system put incredible pressure on teachers.

Ellis said the new standards are changing things for the better. He thinks the shift is good for teachers.

"I see a lot of positive energy," he said. "I think there's a sense of optimism about where things are headed in terms of the teaching and learning of mathematics."

Educators will get an early look at the results; school districts will receive their scores this week, according to Slater.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson told KPCC in July that he expected students will do well, but that performance will be lower since students are learning a new curriculum and getting used to testing on computers.


GROUPS FILE FEDERAL COMPLAINT ALLEGING CIVIL RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN CALIFORNIA PHYSICAL EDUCATION
By Jane Meredith Adams | EdSource | http://bit.ly/1J9PY2w

Aug 14, 2015 |In the latest salvo in a longstanding effort to enforce a California education law that requires physical education classes for all students, six health advocacy organizations filed a federal complaint Thursday charging that California public schools discriminate against Latino and African-American students by disproportionately denying them access to the classes, in violation of federal civil rights law.

The organizations asked for federal intervention to ensure that the California Department of Education and school districts comply with “the legal obligation to provide students with equal access to resources for physical education and fitness without regard to race, color, or national origin,” according to the complaint.

“Black and Hispanic students are systematically denied quality physical education,” according to the complaint sent to Catherine Lhamon, assistant secretary for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Education. The complaint was filed by the The City Project, the California Center for Public Health Advocacy, the California Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, the Prevention Institute, the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California and the Anahuak Youth Sports Association.

“Black and Hispanic students are systematically denied quality physical education,” according to a federal complaint charging civil rights violations in California physical education.

Robert Garcia, founding director of The City Project, a Los Angeles civil rights advocacy group, said the complaint was filed as a federal civil rights violation on the basis of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and an October 2014 so-called “Dear Colleague” guidance letter from Llahmon to educators across the country. That letter reminded educators of their obligation to end “unlawful discrimination” caused by inequities in educational resources.

“Lack of funds does not preclude the duty to act” to fulfill civil rights obligations, Llahmon wrote in the letter, which was cited in the complaint. The complaint expanded on the point by stating, “While sound educational and budgetary judgments by state and local education officials may lead school districts to prioritize certain resources, such decisions cannot reflect unlawful race discrimination in purpose or effect.”

A California Department of Education spokeswoman said Friday that the department had not seen the complaint and was unable to provide comment.

Harold Goldstein, executive director of the California Center for Public Health Advocacy, said in a statement that educators have turned “a blind eye” to the health consequences for children who are not provided consistent, quality physical education instruction.

“Too often these ethnic and racial disparities have a devastating impact on the long-term health and welfare of our children,” Goldstein said. “Without adequate physical education, children are more likely to be obese, develop type 2 diabetes or have a lifetime of costly chronic disease.”

California Education Code requires public schools to provide a minimum of 200 minutes of physical education every 10 days in elementary schools and 400 minutes in middle and high schools. But several studies have found significant non-compliance, including an audit by the California Department of Education of 155 districts from 2004 to 2009 that reported half were not meeting physical education requirements and a 2012 study of 55 districts from 2004 to 2006 by San Francisco State University researchers that found half of the districts were out of compliance.

In March, 37 school districts, including Los Angeles Unified, settled a lawsuit alleging they failed to provide the minimum number of physical education minutes in elementary schools. As a result, the districts are required to publicly document the amount of physical education instruction that elementary students receive, starting this fall and continuing for two to three years, depending on the district.

According to the complaint filed Thursday, the 2012 study by San Francisco State University researchers found that elementary school students in districts that did not comply with physical education minutes requirements “were more likely to be Hispanic or Black and less likely to be white or Asian.”

The California Department of Education includes an evaluation of physical education in its cycle of compliance monitoring of districts, but according to a 2007 report “Physical Education Matters” by researchers at San Diego State University, “There are no real consequences for failure to comply.”

The complaint asked Llahmon of the U.S. Department of Education to send a “Dear Colleague” guidance letter to California educators reminding them of their obligation to ensure equal access to physical education, and take other steps to ensure that physical education minutes are being monitored and fulfilled. To that end, the organizations recommended the use of a Model Action Plan for physical education and a compliance checklist developed by the Los Angeles County Health Department and several of the health organizations that filed the complaint.

Other health and civil rights advocacy groups praised the complaint. Philip Tegeler, executive director of the Poverty & Race Research Action Council, which co-authored an April report titled “Finishing Last: Girls of Color and School Sports Opportunities,” said in a statement,”Disparities in access to sports opportunities and physical fitness programs are another unfortunate aspect of our separate and unequal system of public education – with potential long term health impacts for children of color.”


Complaint Re: Physical Education and Physical Fitness Title VI Compliance in California Public Schools, filed by six organizations, Aug. 13, 2015



HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS & THE NEWS THAT DOESN'T FIT: The Rest (but not necessarily the best) of the Stories from Other Sources
GROUPS FILE FEDERAL COMPLAINT ALLEGING CIVIL RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN CALIFORNIA PHYSICAL EDUCATION
http://bit.ly/1Msd5un

LAPD INVESTIGATES ESQUITH, LAWYERS ‘DECLARE WAR’ ON LAUSD: “LAUSD is acting as a criminal cartel that needs to be put out of business, and we will put them out of business.”
http://bit.ly/1hGjG9b

CORTINES CALLS FOR UNITY IN ANNUAL L.A. SCHOOL DISTRICT ADDRESS
http://bit.ly/1hxAxLz

IN ANNUAL SPEECH, CORTINES OFFERS GOOD CHEER …but (the LA School Report says) leaves out any vision + smf's 2¢
http://bit.ly/1J2Yrsr

FIXING THE NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND LAW: How the House and Senate plans differ
http://bit.ly/1MiV69P

LAUSD STUDENTS GO BACK TO SCHOOL NEXT WEEK
http://bit.ly/1N1Lp11

THE THREE EDUCATION TRENDS PARENTS NEED TO KNOW THIS BACK-TO-SCHOOL SEASON
http://bit.ly/1EkE4BC


EVENTS: Coming up next week...
• TUESDAY AUGUST 18th IS THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL AT TRADITIONAL CALENDAR LAUSD SCHOOLS

• THE LAUSD SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION BOND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE meets at 10AM in the Beaudry Boardroom on Thursday Aug 20

*Dates and times subject to change. ________________________________________
• SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION BOND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE:
http://www.laschools.org/bond/
Phone: 213-241-5183
____________________________________________________
• LAUSD FACILITIES COMMUNITY OUTREACH CALENDAR:
http://www.laschools.org/happenings/
Phone: 213-241.8700


• LAUSD BOARD OF EDUCATION & COMMITTEES MEETING CALENDAR



What can YOU do?
• E-mail, call or write your school board member:
Scott.Schmerelson@lausd.net • 213-241-8333
Monica.Garcia@lausd.net • 213-241-6180
Ref.Rodriguez@lausd.net • 213-241-5555
George.McKenna@lausd.net • 213-241-6382
Monica.Ratliff@lausd.net • 213-241-6388
Richard.Vladovic@lausd.net • 213-241-6385
Steve.Zimmer@lausd.net • 213-241-6387
...or your city councilperson, mayor, county supervisor, state legislator, the governor, member of congress, senator - or the president. Tell them what you really think! • Find your state legislator based on your home address. Just go to: http://bit.ly/dqFdq2 • There are 26 mayors and five county supervisors representing jurisdictions within LAUSD, the mayor of LA can be reached at mayor@lacity.org • 213.978.0600
• Call or e-mail Governor Brown: 213-897-0322 e-mail: http://www.govmail.ca.gov/
• Open the dialogue. Write a letter to the editor. Circulate these thoughts. Talk to the principal and teachers at your local school.
• Speak with your friends, neighbors and coworkers. Stay on top of education issues. Don't take my word for it!
• Get involved at your neighborhood school. Join your PTA. Serve on a School Site Council. Be there for a child.
• If you are eligible to become a citizen, BECOME ONE.
• If you a a citizen, REGISTER TO VOTE at http://registertovote.ca.gov/
• If you are registered, VOTE LIKE THE FUTURE DEPENDS ON IT. THEY DO!


Who are your elected federal & state representatives? How do you contact them?




Scott Folsom is a parent leader in LAUSD and was Parent/Volunteer of the Year for 2010-11 for Los Angeles County. • He is Past President of Los Angeles Tenth District PTSA and has represented PTA on the LAUSD Construction Bond Citizen's Oversight Committee for over 12 years. He is Vice President for Health, Legislation Action Committee member and a member of the Board of Directors of the California State PTA. He serves on numerous school district advisory and policy committees and has served as a PTA officer and governance council member at three LAUSD schools. He is the recipient of the UTLA/AFT "WHO" Gold Award and the ACSA Regional Ferd Kiesel Memorial Distinguished Service Award - honors he hopes to someday deserve. • In this forum his opinions are his own and your opinions and feedback are invited. Quoted and/or cited content copyright © the original author and/or publisher. All other material copyright © 4LAKids.
• FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. 4LAKids makes such material available in an effort to advance understanding of education issues vital to parents, teachers, students and community members in a democracy. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.
• To SUBSCRIBE e-mail: 4LAKids-subscribe@topica.email-publisher.com - or -TO ADD YOUR OR ANOTHER'S NAME TO THE 4LAKids SUBSCRIPTION LIST E-mail smfolsom@aol.com with "SUBSCRIBE" AS THE SUBJECT. Thank you.