Sunday, October 31, 2010

Tempestuousness in the Tea Party

Onward! smf SchoolBoard!
4LAKids: Sunday 31•Oct•2010 Happy Halloween
In This Issue:
SAN PEDRO HIGH SCHOOL TO HOUSE TRUANCY CENTER + LAUSD News Release
SURVEY SAYS NEARLY HALF OF ALL STUDENTS HAVE BEEN BULLIED IN LAST YEAR
DEFUNDING BULLIES: Schools, including colleges, will be required to adopt anti-bullying plans after an incident or face the loss of federal aid
HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT, GRADUATION, AND COMPLETION RATES: BETTER DATA, BETTER MEASURES, BETTER DECISIONS
HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS & THE NEWS THAT DOESN'T FIT: The Rest of the Stories from Other Sources
EVENTS: Coming up next week...
What can YOU do?


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PUBLIC SCHOOLS: an investment we can't afford to cut! - The Education Coalition Website
4LAKids Anthology: All the Past Issues, solved, resolved and unsolved!
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`Really, now you ask me,' said Alice, very much confused, `I don't think--'

`Then you shouldn't talk,' said the Hatter.

- Lewis Carroll "The Mad Tea-Party", Chapter VII of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. http://bit.ly/cRNlrA


IF THE POLLING TRENDS HOLD the Dems are going to lose fairly big time - and the Repos will gain - in Tuesday's election. Except in California ...and this may be why we live here!

I would feel much better about this is the public was voting displeasure with the Obama Education Agenda - but they aren't.

In a last minute tempest the teapartiers have threatened hapless McDonald's employees that they would close up shop and close down their Mickey D's franchise in Ohio if the employees don't vote Republican. http://huff.to/aFvavD The underlying threat to All American salt-and-saturated-fat infused dining is palpable. When forced to choose between free expression in the political arena or inexpensive chicken nuggets in the fast-food outlet -- how would YOU vote?

In California the Boxer Campaign suggested to LA Teachers that working as volunteers for the Boxer Campaign might be a great way for students to earn extra credit: http://bit.ly/c52UD8. And the Howard Jarvis Tea-Partiers screamed foul: HTTP://bitchily/9LgfHG (Or "fowl" if you're still considering the McDonald’s perplexity.) The very folks who would don warpaint+feathers and dump the California Ed Code into the harbor - and turn public schools over to Privateers/Charterers and Vouchers quote the Ed Code chapter, verse and section (Chapter 3, Section 51520).- misapplying the code for on-campus-fundaising to off-campus-political-volunteerism.

Free Speech is apparently about unlimited secret campaign funding, not public political expression.

POLITICAL ENDORSEMENTS: I'm not making any* - do your research and vote your own mind. Just vote! I did spend Saturday and this AM walking a precinct in Eagle Rock for the Dems - but this blog is about public education and we are way too short on independent thinking.

That said, MY SOLE CAMPAIGN RANT IS ABOUT STEVE COOLEY. Cooley didn't prosecute Stephen Rooney - a serial child molester/school district employee http://bit.ly/bSrMGB -so Rooney could molest little girls at schools AGAIN. Going all negative: Rooney is a bad man and Cooley is a bad DA.

A SURVEY says that nearly half of students have been bullied over the past year.. So, in two years....

ANOTHER STUDY SHOWS we don't have good data (and, by extension, a clue) on what Graduation and Dropout Rates really are. In California. The G├╝bernataor has defunded the gathering of grad-and-dropout-rate data - so we'll just use the tired old erroneous data in identification of bogeyman Bad Schools, Bad Teachers and Failing Systems.

MICHELLE RHEE'S LAST DAY at what she promised would be her last job in education was last Friday.

OTHER STUDIES show we are unable to evaluate charter schools in California.

New York City will release VALUE-ADDED TEACHER SCORES. . Oops ...no they won't!


"Nothing you do for children is ever wasted. They seem not to notice us, hovering, averting our eyes, and they seldom offer thanks, but what we do for them is never wasted." - Garrison Keillor

Thank you for everything you do for kids every day.

¡Onward/Adelante! - smf


* OK - Brown, Newsom, Bowen, Chiang, Lockyer, Harris, Jones, Torlackson, Boxer., Noguez - YES on 21,24,25,27 - NO on 19, 20,22.23,26.


SAN PEDRO HIGH SCHOOL TO HOUSE TRUANCY CENTER + LAUSD News Release

SAN PEDRO HIGH SCHOOL TO HOUSE TRUANCY CENTER: One of eight new Attendance Improvement Centers in LAUSD + LAUSD News Release
Daily Breeze - From staff reports | http://bit.ly/9cMTFY

10/25/2010 08:35:42 AM PDT - SAN PEDRO :: San Pedro High School will house one of eight new truancy intervention centers being set up by the Los Angeles Unified School District.

The so-called Attendance Improvement Centers are set to open Nov. 1.

Instead of getting a citation for skipping school, students will be taken to the centers, where they will be provided grade-level instruction while they wait for parent pickup.

"The district is working on expanding educational options for students that do not fit the typical protocol of a student," said LAUSD Chief Academic Officer Judy Elliott in a press release. "The AIC is but one way to provide a multipronged approach to keeping students in schools and off the streets."

Referrals to community resources and services and other assistance will be provided for students or parents who are facing problems related to truancy, the district said.

The centers will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. They are a collaboration between the school district, local law enforcement agencies, the courts and the community.


LAUSD ANNOUNCES OPENING OF ATTENDANCE IMPROVEMENT CENTERS

The eight centers will serve as an alternative to truancy citations issued for curfew violations

LAUSD news Release | http://bit.ly/aJ9tUs


October 22, 2010 - Los Angeles—The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) is investing in a deterrent/intervention program for truants with the opening of eight new Attendance Improvement Centers (AIC) across the District beginning November 1. These centers will serve as an alternative to truancy citations that are issued for daytime curfew violations.

“We are thrilled to be offering an alternative to truancy and citations for our LAUSD youth. The Attendance Improvement Centers (AICs) are places where we intend to get students back on track by providing options to truancy and drop out,” said Dr. Judy Elliott, LAUSD’s Chief Academic Officer.

“The District is working on expanding educational options for students that do not fit the typical protocol of a student. We have increased our use of technology and online courses for credit recoupment and acceleration. The AIC is but one way to provide a multi-pronged approach to keeping students in schools and off the streets. Our goal is 100 percent graduation. To that end, we must create the options our students need,” she added.

Under the Los Angeles Municipal Code (45.04), juveniles are prohibited from loitering during the hours of the day when school, which the minor would normally attend, is in session, on days when that school is in session. Additionally, California’s Compulsory Education Law (EC section 48200) requires that every child between the ages of 6-18 years old must attend school every day and on time.

LAUSD officials believe the AICs will not only provide a service to the District’s neediest students by preventing them from becoming victims or perpetrators of crimes, but help them on their path to becoming productive members of society.

Currently, school truancy is one of several patterns of behavior known to increase the likelihood of delinquency. Youth who do not attend school are more likely to become involved with drugs, alcohol, gangs and violence than youth who attend school. Truancy can cause students to fall behind in school, which can lead them to dropout. Dropouts have higher rates of incarceration and addiction, lower-paying jobs and a greater tendency for unemployment over their lifetime.

The Attendance Improvement Centers also provide truant students with a safe educational program during the school day while they await parent pick up. While at the AICs, students will receive instruction and are required to complete grade-level work assigned to them.

Students held at the AICs must exhibit appropriate behavior in the AIC classroom. The objective is to teach students to assume responsibility for their actions, to learn to exercise self-control, and to provide them with an intervention that can guide them towards success.

The AICs will be located on the campuses of:

* Sepulveda MS (Local District 2)
* Belmont SH (Local District 4)
* Burbank MS (Local District 4)
* Santee Education Complex (Local District 5)
* El Sereno MS (Local District 5)
* Gage MS (Local District 6)
* Washington Preparatory SH (Local District 8)
* San Pedro SH (Local District 8)

During the school year, the Attendance Improvement Centers will be open from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

The Attendance Improvement Centers are a collaborative effort involving the LAUSD, local law enforcement agencies, the courts, and the community. The centers’ goals are to ensure an education for every child, improve attendance, reduce juvenile crimes, and increase parent involvement and accountability. Assistance will be provided to students/parents who may be experiencing problems or issues related to truancy. Referrals to resources and services in the community will be provided so families can seek additional help.

To learn more about the Attendance Improvement Centers, please call (213) 241-3844.


SURVEY SAYS NEARLY HALF OF ALL STUDENTS HAVE BEEN BULLIED IN LAST YEAR
By Melissa Evans, Staff Writer | LA Daily News | http://bit.ly/dBNohB

28 October 2010 - Nearly half of the nation's high school students say they have been bullied in the last year and an equal number say they they taunted or teased a classmate, according to a new survey.

The survey of more than 43,000 high school students by the Josephson Institute of Ethics in Westchester comes on the heels of recent suicides by teens relentlessly tormented by bullies.

The institute found that 47 percent of respondents said they had been harassed in a way that was seriously upsetting, and half admitted to bullying a classmate. Nearly a quarter of students said they do not feel safe at school.
from THE josephson Institute of Ethics |http://josephsoninstitute.org/

2010 Report Card on the Ethics of American Youth: Bullying and other at-risk behavior
Bullying is widespread, says Institute study

Results from a survey of over 40,000 high school students reveal high rates of at-risk

"This is a real problem," said Michael Josephson, founder and president of the nonprofit institute, which runs school-based character-building programs. "The numbers are pretty disturbing."

The survey is considered an accurate bellwether of beliefs among young people. The respondents included teens from different age groups, geographic regions, academic levels and socioeconomic groups. The margin of error is less than 1 percentage point.

Conducted since 1992, the survey included questions about bullying for the first time this year. Though kids have always bullied, Josephson said it appears the growing popularity of online social networking and the Internet in general has given bullies a powerful new tool to cause harm.

"At least before you could change your school, or your environment," he said. "That doesn't work anymore.

Now you cannot escape it, and the chances of this causing deep scars and deep depression are really increasing."

A recent spate of suicides among teenagers subjected to bullying - including Tyler Clementi, a Rutgers University freshman who was videotaped having a sexual encounter with a man, then jumped off a bridge after the video was posted online - provide anecdotal evidence of this trend.

A number of politicians, including President Barack Obama, have spoken out on the issue in recent days. On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Education sent out letters to schools, colleges and universities reminding them of their federal obligations to protect students.

At Los Angeles Unified, bullying is defined as "the deliberate antagonistic action or creation of a situation with the intent of inflicting emotional, physical, or psychological distress."

According to district policy, bullying can also include cyber-bullying, and recenty officials have taken special actions to target the bullying of gay students who report being harassed at higher rates than their heterosexual peers.

"Bullying is a serious issue and it's one that students are very concerned with, they talk to me about it all the time when I meet with them," Superintendent Ramon Cortines.

"I am telling all my teachers and principals to talk to their students and parents when these issues arise," he said. "I don't want them to just say these things just happen."

Cortines addressed bullying in this week's "On the Record," which airs via KLCS-TV, the LAUSD's Education Station. It will be repeated at 7 a.m. Sunday.

Josephson said parents should talk to their kids regularly, and be proactive in reporting harassment to school officials and, in some cases, to the parents of bullies. Schools, meanwhile, need to be innovative in the way they approach bullying, they said.

"We have to create much more positive environments, pro-respect environments, not just anti-bullying environments," Josephson said.

He added that children also need to be more resilient in the face of bullying, because "we're not going to be able to shield from name-calling. We need to fortify our young people to deal with that, and not take it so personally."

Staff Writer Connie Llanos contributed to this report.


DEFUNDING BULLIES: Schools, including colleges, will be required to adopt anti-bullying plans after an incident or face the loss of federal aid
LA Times Editorial | http://lat.ms/95KOSX

October 28, 2010 -- School officials invariably express great sorrow when campus bullying leads to tragedy; they also usually say that they are shocked to find that anyone was being harassed, even when the victim or parents have complained. But nothing actually gets schools to change their behavior like the promise of money or the threat of its removal. That's why it was heartening to learn that the U.S. Department of Education took its first strong steps against bullying this week by announcing that schools might lose federal funding for failing to stop bullying of gay students on campus.

There are federal civil rights laws that, at least theoretically, prohibit harassment of students on the basis of race, national origin, gender or religion, and in his announcement, Education Secretary Arne Duncan told schools to use them to enforce rules against bullying. In addition, the department will use court rulings on gender discrimination to include gay and lesbian students among those protected groups. Schools, including colleges, will be required to adopt anti-bullying plans after an incident or face the possible loss of federal aid. The U.S. Department of Justice also might be brought in to investigate. The new get-tough policy came after the recent suicides of five gay teenagers who had been harassed at school, as well as the suicides of several straight teenagers who had been bullied.

The Education Department is right to use all the powers at its disposal, and it should indeed take tough legal action when schools fail to protect vulnerable populations. But federal civil rights laws are an awkward tool for changing student culture on campus, and even department officials concede that the laws would be invoked only in the most extreme cases. And what about the bullying of students who don't fall within one of the protected categories? All students have the right to feel safe on campus. The tolerant attitude toward bullying among many school officials is as unacceptable as the harassment itself.

It's too bad the Education Department took so long to take steps against bullying. It could have used the Race to the Top program, under which states receive large federal grants for agreeing to education reforms, to push for meaningful state laws that would create effective anti-bullying programs for all public schools, and require the schools to use them.

That opportunity was missed, but there will be others. Many schools have successfully changed campus culture. We already know what works — a combination of educating students and the community to understand that cruel behavior hurts others in terrible ways, and disciplining the bullies rather than trying to get the victims to change. Duncan should use both his funding clout and his bully pulpit to send an insistent message that states and individual schools must use both weapons against the kinds of bullying that make school a daily misery for too many students.


HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT, GRADUATION, AND COMPLETION RATES: BETTER DATA, BETTER MEASURES, BETTER DECISIONS
National Academies Press | http://bit.ly/dtd4ww

* High school graduation and dropout rates have long been used as indicators of educational system productivity and effectiveness and of social and economic well being. While determining these rates may seem like a straightforward task, their calculation is in fact quite complicated. How does one count a student who leaves a regular high school but later completes a GED? How does one count a student who spends most of his/her high school years at one school and then transfers to another? If the student graduates, which school should receive credit? If the student drops out, which school should take responsibility?
* High School Dropout, Graduation, and Completion Rates addresses these issues and to examine (1) the strengths, limitations, accuracy, and utility of the available dropout and completion measures; (2) the state of the art with respect to longitudinal data systems; and (3) ways that dropout and completion rates can be used to improve policy and practice.
* Authors:Robert M. Hauser and Judith Anderson Koenig, Editors; Committee for Improved Measurement of High School Dropout and Completion Rates: Expert Guidance on Next Steps for Research and Policy Workshop; National Research Council and National Academy of Education

October 28, 2010 -- A new joint report from the National Research Council and the National Academy of Education offers guidance on measuring high school dropout and graduation rates -- a key and sometimes controversial indicator of a school system's effectiveness. The most accurate rates are those that track students over the entire course of their schooling, the report says. It adds that accountability policies should require schools and districts to set and meet progress goals for improving their graduation rates

SUMMARY [Prepublication Copy, uncorrected proofs]

High school graduation and dropout rates have long been used as indicators of educational system productivity and effectiveness and of social and economic well being.

While determining these rates may seem like a straightforward task, their calculation is in fact quite complicated. How does one count a student who leaves a regular high school but later completes a GED? How does one count a student who spends most of his/her high school years at one school and then transfers to another? If the student graduates, which school should receive credit? If the student drops out, which school should take responsibility?

The Committee on Improved Measurement of High School Dropout and Completion Rates was asked to address these issues and to examine (1) the strengths, limitations, accuracy, and utility of the available dropout and completion measures; (2) the state of the art with respect to longitudinal data systems; and (3) ways that dropout and completion rates can be used to improve policy and practice.

The Rates and How They Are Calculated

In their simplest sense, graduation rates reflect the percent of students who earned a regular high school diploma, and dropout rates reflect the percent of students who did not. However, the requirements for earning a regular diploma vary widely among states and districts, and there are multiple means of completing school besides earning a regular diploma after attending high school for four years. Students may earn a GED, a certificate of attendance, or another alternative type of diploma. They may take longer than the typical four years before completing high school and may transfer across schools or districts before graduating or dropping out. There are a variety of strategies for accounting for these factors in calculating dropout, completion, and graduation rates; different strategies will affect the appropriateness of the rate for a given purpose. Thus, decisions about how to handle these factors should be consistent with the purpose for calculating the rate.

For example, if the purpose is to describe the level of education of the population, what matters is people’s eventual level of education, not what kind of diploma they received or how long it took them to earn it. But if the purpose is to evaluate a school’s effectiveness in graduating students in four years, those factors are of critical importance.

All methods for calculating the rates require decisions about who to include in the numerator and denominator of the rate and how to handle certain groups of students, such as those who receive a GED or who take longer than four years to graduate.

We recommend that analysts and users keep their purpose in mind when selecting from among the various kinds of rates and choose the indicator best suited to that purpose (Recommendation 4-11). To help users draw sound conclusions, analysts should document the limitations of the rate and the decisions that went into calculating it (Recommendations 3-1 and 3-2). When the limitations are made explicit, alternative rates can be calculated to verify any conclusions drawn from the statistic (Recommendations 3-3 and 3-4).

1Recommendation 4-1 is the first recommendation in Chapter 4. Other recommendations are numbered accordingly.

The most accurate rates are those based on longitudinal data that track students over the course of their schooling, and we recommend that dropout and completion rates be based on individual student-level data whenever possible. This will allow for the greatest flexibility and transparency with respect to how analysts handle methodological issues that arise in defining the numerator and denominator of the rates (Recommendation 4-2).

Building Data Systems

Calculating rates based on individual data requires that states have a system for tracking students over time. At a minimum such a system needs unique student identifiers as well complete information on students’ enrollment status throughout high school. However, a more comprehensive system would incorporate data elements that allow school systems to monitor students’ progress, identify students at risk of dropping out, and evaluate the effectiveness of programs to reduce dropping out. To perform these functions, data systems require detailed longitudinal data (Recommendation 6-1).

Producing accurate rates requires that states and districts adopt procedures to ensure the quality of their data; we, therefore, recommend that all states and districts maintain written documentation of their processes, procedures, and results. The documentation should be updated annually and should include a process for adding elements or making changes to the system (Recommendation 6-2).

Because the quality of the data begins at the point when data are collected and entered into the system, it is important that training be provided for those who carry out these tasks. We recommend that all states and districts implement a system of extensive and on-going staff training that addresses procedures for collection, storage, analysis, and use of the data (Recommendation 6-3) and conduct regular audits to verify data quality (Recommendation 6-4).

How Data Systems Can Improve Policy and Practice Improving graduation rates in this country requires more than simply reporting accurate rates. To truly improve outcomes for students, data systems need to incorporate information that enables early identification of at-risk students. Research suggests a number of factors associated with dropping out: frequent absences, failing grades in reading or math, poor behavior, being over age for grade, having a low ninth-grade GPA, failing ninth grade, or having a record of frequent transfers. These findings suggest that states and districts should build data systems that incorporate documented early indicators of the risk of dropping out. At the same time, they should also conduct their own studies to determine the factors associated with dropping out from their school systems. Once determined, measures of these factors should be incorporated into the data system so at-risk students can be identified in time to intervene (Recommendation 5-1).

Finally, the federal government should play an active role in this area by collecting data on these early indicators. These indicators should be collected by grade level and should include variables such as the number of students missing a month or more of school, average number of days absent, average number of course failures, number of students failing one course or more, mean GPA, and indicators of behavior problems. Collecting these data would allow for indications of progress toward graduation at the national level and enable comparative studies on early indicators of dropout across states and localities (Recommendation 7-4).

As educational accountability focuses increasingly on the successful completion of high school, appropriate, relevant, and understandable measures of high school dropout and completion are becoming more important as indicators of the functioning of schools and of students’ preparation for college and work. The findings and recommendations of this report are provided to guide the creation of such indicators at the local, state and national levels.


Link to Complete Report



HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS & THE NEWS THAT DOESN'T FIT: The Rest of the Stories from Other Sources
PSL v2.0: GROUPS OFFER COMPETING PITCHES TO RUN GRANADA HILLS SCHOOL: By Connie Llanos, Staff Writer | Los Angeles... http://bit.ly/8ZPvaT

TEACHERS AND STUDENTS LOSE OUT WITH ACLU-LAUSD AGREEMENT: Say no to layoffs, support public school teachers, famil... http://bit.ly/aBvQ8T

RESULTS AT ARENE DUNCAN’S FIST CHICAGO TURNAROUND SCHOOL RAISE EFFICACY AND LEGAL QUESTIONS + smf’s 2¢: by Li... http://bit.ly/a681O7

OVERCOMING BULLYING IN LAUSD SCHOOLS: Superintendent Cortines Discusses a National Epidemic--BULLYING: LAUSD News ... http://bit.ly/9a7cav

HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT, GRADUATION, AND COMPLETION RATES: BETTER DATA, BETTER MEASURES, BETTER DECISIONS: National Ac... http://bit.ly/co5wAf

48th IS NOT A GOOD PLACE: World Economic Forum ranks U.S. 48th out of 133 developed and developing nations in qua... http://bit.ly/9kZ1cr

It’s time for Civic Participation: STUDENTS LEARN HOW IN SCHOOLS: Themes in the News for the week of Oct. 25-29, 2... http://bit.ly/d8FgYE

REPORT: STUDENT LEARNING EXPECATIONS GAP CAN BE TWICE THE SIZE OF NATIONAL ‘BLACK/WHITE ACHIEVEMENT GAP’: What st... http://bit.ly/d8v4FE

BROWN’S AND WHITMAN’S PLATFORMS:Notable differences in style and substance: By John Fensterwald - Educated Gu... http://bit.ly/bCjEpE

MICHELLE RHEE OUTSPOKEN TO THE END OF HER TENURE AS D.C.SCHOOLS CHANCELLOR: Takes on ineffective teachers and the ... http://bit.ly/dnZRXR

OBAMA PLAYS CHEERLEADING ROLE FOR STEM EDUCATION + video: By Erik W. Robelen | EdWeek Vol. 30, Issue 10 | http://b... http://bit.ly/b1xWJR

IS FEAR OF BILINGUALISM PART OF U.S. CULTURE?: By Mary Ann Zehr | EdWEEK | http://bit.ly/du5MRM October 29, 2010 ... http://bit.ly/9nLFpv

OVER 10 MILLION STUDENTS NOW USE GOOGLE APPS FOR EDUCATION: By Frederic Lardinois / ReadWriteWeb.com | http://rww.... http://bit.ly/brplW8

SOCIAL JUSTICE OR ATTACK ON LA TEACHERS?: Randy Childs, a member of United Teachers Los Angeles, looks at how an e... http://bit.ly/cG2hmj

VENICE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS REPORT CAFETERIA FOOD SHORTAGE: By Cathy Asapahu - The Oarsman Venice High School Los ... http://bit.ly/9RQBqj

SURVEY SAYS NEARLY HALF OF ALL STUDENTS HAVE BEEN BULLIED IN LAST YEAR: Survey says nearly half of all students ha... http://bit.ly/bhrUop

DEFUNDING BULLIES: Schools, including colleges, will be required to adopt anti-bullying plans after an incident or... http://bit.ly/aAHu4r

LAUSD IMPROVES ITS HIRING OVERSIGHT: Audit shows fewer conflicts of interest since 2006: By Connie Llanos, Staff W... http://bit.ly/9Qzz5d

CITY AUDIT OF L.A. UNIFIED IS RELEASED; REPORT FOCUSES ON SYSTEMIC PROBLEMS: by Howard Blume – LA Times/LA Now | h... http://bit.ly/bgdZVy

CITY CONTROLLER RELEASES PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF LAUSD’S FACILITIES SERVICES DIVISION, NEW CONSTRUCTION BRANCH: SELEC... http://bit.ly/d6pIUE

MELROSE ELEMENTARY KIDS GET THEIR HANDS DIRTY WITH WOOLLY SCHOOL GARDENS AND CHEF ANDREA CAVALIRE: LA Weekly Blog ... http://bit.ly/8XHbEX

SAN PEDRO HIGH SCHOOL TO HOUSE TRUANCY CENTER: One of eight new Attendance Improvement Centers in LAUSD + LAUSD Ne... http://bit.ly/bWUoex

THE LOWDOWN ON HOMEWORK: How much homework is too much?: Grade-by-grade guidelines for what kids can reasonably be... http://bit.ly/cnnRU6

ICEF REVISITED: by smf for 4LAKids I received a phone call this AM from Caprice Young -- the CEO of ICEF Charter ... http://bit.ly/cpDqxw


EVENTS: Coming up next week...
• Monday Nov 1, 2010
SOUTH REGION MIDDLE SCHOOL #2: RIBBON-CUTTING CEREMONY
Time: 10:00 a.m.
Location:
South Region Middle School #2
3620 Gage Ave.
Bell, CA

• Wednesday Nov 3, 2010
BARACK OBAMA GLOBAL PREPARATION ACADEMY (AKA SOUTH REGION MIDDLE SCHOOL #6)
Grand Opening Ceremony
Time: 9:00 a.m.
Location:
Barack Obama Global Preparation Academy
1700 W. 46th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90062

• Friday Nov 5, 2010
VALLEY REGION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL #10: RIBBON-CUTTING CEREMONY
Time: 10:00 a.m.
Location:
Valley Region Elementary School #10
7335 N. Lubao Ave.
Canoga Park, CA 91306


*Dates and times subject to change. ________________________________________
• SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION BOND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE:
http://www.laschools.org/bond/
Phone: 213-241-5183
____________________________________________________
• LAUSD FACILITIES COMMUNITY OUTREACH CALENDAR:
http://www.laschools.org/happenings/
Phone: 213-241.8700


• LAUSD BOARD OF EDUCATION & COMMITTEES MEETING CALENDAR



What can YOU do?
• E-mail, call or write your school board member:
Yolie.Flores.Aguilar@lausd.net • 213-241-6383
Tamar.Galatzan@lausd.net • 213-241-6386
Monica.Garcia@lausd.net • 213-241-6180
Marguerite.LaMotte@lausd.net • 213-241-6382
Nury.Martinez@lausd.net • 213-241-6388
Richard.Vladovic@lausd.net • 213-241-6385
Steve.Zimmer@lausd.net • 213-241-6387
...or your city councilperson, mayor, the governor, member of congress, senator - or the president. Tell them what you really think! • Find your state legislator based on your home address. Just go to: http://bit.ly/dqFdq2 • There are 26 mayors and five county supervisors representing jurisdictions within LAUSD, the mayor of LA can be reached at mayor@lacity.org • 213.978.0600
• Call or e-mail Governor Schwarzenegger: 213-897-0322 e-mail: http://www.govmail.ca.gov/
• Open the dialogue. Write a letter to the editor. Circulate these thoughts. Talk to the principal and teachers at your local school.
• Speak with your friends, neighbors and coworkers. Stay on top of education issues. Don't take my word for it!
• Get involved at your neighborhood school. Join your PTA. Serve on a School Site Council. Be there for a child.
• If you are eligible to become a citizen, BECOME ONE.
• If you a a citizen, REGISTER TO VOTE.
• If you are registered, VOTE LIKE THE FUTURE DEPENDS ON IT.


Who are your elected federal & state representatives? How do you contact them?




Scott Folsom is a parent leader in LAUSD and is Parent/Volunteer of the Year for 2010-11 for Los Angeles County. • He is Past President of Los Angeles Tenth District PTSA and represents PTA on the LAUSD Construction Bond Citizen's Oversight Committee. He is a Health Commissioner, Legislation Team member and a member of the Board of Managers of the California State PTA. He serves on numerous school district advisory and policy committees and has served as a PTA officer and governance council member at three LAUSD schools. He is the recipient of the UTLA/AFT 2009 "WHO" Gold Award for his support of education and public schools - an honor he hopes to someday deserve. • In this forum his opinions are his own and your opinions and feedback are invited. Quoted and/or cited content copyright © the original author and/or publisher. All other material copyright © 4LAKids.
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