Sunday, June 24, 2012

Beyond Beaudry.


Onward! 4LAKids
4LAKids: Sunday 24•July•2012
In This Issue:
 •  16 LAUSD SCHOOLS TO LOSE $60 MILLION IN STUDENT-ACHIEVEMENT FUNDS FOR FAILING TO MEET STANDARDS + smf (+other)’s 2¢
 •  SOME CUTS, SOME CASH IN BUDGET DEAL: No change in grade point eligibility for Cal Grant
 •  BUDGET CUTS DIMINISH EVALUATIONS OF TEACHER PREP PROGRAMS
 •  CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2012!
 •  HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS & THE NEWS THAT DOESN'T FIT: The Rest (but not necessarily the best) of the Stories from Other Sources
 •  EVENTS: Coming up next week...
 •  What can YOU do?


Featured Links:
 •  OUR CHILDREN, OUR FUTURE: What will California schoolchildren, your school district and YOUR School get when the initiative passes?
 •  Follow 4 LAKids on Twitter - or get instant updates via text message by texting
 •  4LAKids Anthology: All the Past Issues, solved, resolved and unsolved!
 •  4LAKidsNews: a compendium of recent items of interest - news stories, scurrilous rumors, links, academic papers, rants and amusing anecdotes, etc.
On Thursday at noon they had a block party at Beaudry. Closed down a street – set up a stage – brought in some food trucks – bands of student musicians played.

It was good to see those one normally sees indoors in their cubicles and offices out in the clear – and disinfecting – sunshine of the light of day. I was great to witness the talent of the young people.

It wasn’t a union rally or an angry protest; no sports team had won a championship. It was a glorious Thursday afternoon in June. . School’s Out for Summer. And for some: the recently graduated, retired – or terminally RIFed – Forever.

It was Beyond the Bell’s celebration of itself and of LAUSD’s afterschool programs – and a fine time was had by all.

BtB is the brainchild and legacy of John Liecthy: The Man who Understood Middle Schoolers.

When John died far too soon they named a Middle School after him. In Britain they call vacuum cleaners “Hoovers”; when one vacuums one “hoovers” the rug. The noun and the verb. John was like that about middle schools and afterschool programs. Oh sure, John was irascible and a troublemaker. Bit of a loose cannon. Like those are bad things!

Never mind that Deasy&Co. plan to pull the plug on BtB afterschool programs – and padlock the playgrounds ten minutes after the last bell next year. 14,000+ K-8 kids will be affected at 85 campuses – sent home or out onto the streets at the end of the school day as LAUSD zeroes out afterschool programs. Flatline. BEEEEeeeep…..

Sure, some children will go to the library or the park or to little league practice. Some parents and boosters and PTAs and philanthropists will buy or sponsor afterschool programs at some schools. Some kids will be served. Some kids will be saved. Some kids will be safe.

“Kasserian ingera” is the traditional greeting between in the Masai people of the Serengeti Plain: “How are the children?”

“Sapati ingera”: “All the children are well,” is the traditional reply. All.

Thursday afternoon bands played and the sun shone and guys in taco trucks with high school diplomas sold a buck-and-a-quarter’s worth of beans and rice and sliced sausage to Master’s Degrees and Ph.D’s for $10. And nobody cared. The cupcakes were to die for. Never mind they cost $4. It hardly seemed like a wake at all.


THURSDAY EVENING SOME OF THE MEMBERS OF THE LAUSD BUILDING TRADES – the carpenters and painters and plumbers – the Maintenance+Operations folk who fix and repair stuff - who answer trouble calls and keep kids safe at a thousand schools spread out over 710 square miles - met in the Valley. Their RIF’s haven’t been rescinded. [Deasy kinda/sorta/waffly addressed this in an interview on Wednesday [http://bit.ly/MDLQw7] Tradespeople will have their RIFs rescinded based on seniority and the ability/willingness to “repurpose work”. M+O workers are seeing their jobs farmed and contracted out – their work “repurposed” – sometimes to members of different crafts or to other locals in their same unions. Divide and conquer/RIF and outsource. Their business agents don’t see the problem: union guys are getting the jobs. But their families and kids do …because they don’t have jobs.

They are told by the District that if the Governor’s Tax Plan doesn’t pass it will get worse (more RIFs/more furlough days) …while the teachers are promised that if the Governor’s Plan passes it will get better (RIF’s rescinded/less furlough days). Read that again. The difference in the language is slight …but insidious.


FRIDAY MORNING THERE WAS A PRESS CONFERENCE/PHOTO OP at Dahlia Heights Elementary School in Eagle Rock to try and save the Beyond the Bell Afterschool Program there and throughout LAUSD. http://t.co/0KPVykDL | http://bit.ly/Mq4BWv School Boardmemeber Kayser was there. Jackie Goldberg. Community activists. Representatives of LA’s BEST from the mayor’s office. Concerned policemen. Worried parents. PTA moms+dads. Sweet Alice Harris from Watts. Kids. Babies. The media. Educators and scholars downloaded data to prove the point everyone knows anecdotally already: Children need afterschool programs to be safe, to learn, to succeed, to grow and to play – because Play is the Work of Children.

As our friend the school policeman pointed out: “The gangs aren’t cutting back on their programs!”

Back on February 14th – on the day of the infamous Valentines Day Budget Massacre and before the “cone of silence” descended - Alvaro Cortes, executive director of Beyond the Bell, said in an interview with Ed Week [http://bit.ly/L5F95M ] the cuts to the after-school programs would be disastrous for students and their parents, leaving many without a place to go from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
"I understand this is a horrific state of finances for all of our schools, but we have to decide what are the most essential programs and basic necessities for our students [when making budget cuts]," said Cortes. "I happen to think before-school and after-school care, providing a nurturing environment for our kids from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., is a basic necessity for our kids and something we owe their parents to provide."

Beyond the Bell’s afterschool program is being zeroed out, but Teacher Assessment and Evaluation, Value added and the ®eform, Inc. agenda are being obsessively pursued big time. ”I don’t think so but…” Jackie Goldberg said. “...perhaps those are good ideas. But we know that afterschool programs are a great idea that works. You don’t abandon successful ideas to try new ideas …especially not now when the money is scarce!”

A parent likened the situation to a very Grimm Fairy Tale: Things are going from bad to worse and the adults are dumping the kids onto the streets – into the very dark forest where we all know the wolves are. At Dahlia Heights we promised the kids that scary story won’t end that way. Now we and they need all of you – including you Dr. Deasy – to keep the promise every parent makes to every child: “You will be safe”.

IN THE CURRENT BEAUDRY REGIME LAUSD STAFF IS DISCOURAGED from speaking up and speaking against the current direction – discouraged even from speaking to school board members - whether in defense of programs or in questioning “what’s best for kids” – an attitude that might be looked upon by the Powers-that-Be as disloyalty to the Powers-that-Be.

In the Restructuring/Reconstitution/Privatization troublemakers need not reapply.

Educators are an opinionated bunch and thrive on sharing their opinions. The pervasive uncharacteristic silence by staff doesn’t signify lockstep wholesale agreement …. If they agreed they’d say so. It is evidence of something darker going on. There is a palpable culture of fear at Beaudry and at what’s left of the local districts and at the school sites. Employee morale is as low as it goes. Jobs and futures are at stake. The economy is in shambles. Big Brother is watching.

To paraphrase Pastor Martin Niem├Âller: “First they came for Adult Ed….” So it is and was and must not forever be.

There are exceptions. The school policeman – and president of the school police officers union – said he would’ve supported eleven days of furlough if that would’ve guaranteed that afterschool programs continued. I can’t speak for the guys in the building trades – but I suspect they would agree …IF the deal negotiations were open, honest and transparent.

IN OTHER NEWS: •California really doesn’t have a budget, it has a budget document and deal with the governor – whom it turns out – like his predecessor - has never seen a charter school he didn’t like. And none of it solves anything …until November – when everything changes, either for the bad …or for the worse. •A government study shows that charter schools aren’t serving special needs students. All together: Duh! •Autism help for Latino parents is insufficient. •Eliminating 52% of Adult Ed “saves” it – as does closing 20 Early Ed Centers. (‘Decimate’ only means eliminating 10%!) •The Brown Initiative - which adds no new funding stream to education – but does shore it and every other program at Sacramento’s whim up - and the PTA/Munger Initiative– which does bring about $10 billion in new funding (protected from Sacramento) to public education will be on the November ballot – along with 9 other initiatives. •Duffy is lonely. •And I’m not running the story of how some Eagle rock parents are suing LAUSD because their straight A child (who got a full ride to Stanford) didn’t get to be valedictorian.

In Philadelphia they convicted the monsignor of child endangerment. Not for what he did to children - but for what he didn’t do for children

School’s out. Please, let’s be extra careful out there.

¡Onward/Adelante! - smf


16 LAUSD SCHOOLS TO LOSE $60 MILLION IN STUDENT-ACHIEVEMENT FUNDS FOR FAILING TO MEET STANDARDS + smf (+other)’s 2¢
• 3 out of 4 middle schools cut from QEIA are in the mayor’s partnership.
• 85 LAUSD schools met the goals

By Barbara Jones, Staff Writer | LA Daily News http://bit.ly/Mg6YMr

6/22/2012 07:24:44 PM PDT :: Sixteen struggling Los Angeles Unified schools will lose nearly $60 million from a state program designed to boost student achievement after they fell short in raising scores on standardized tests, according to officials.

The district campuses are among roughly 130 statewide that will be dropped July 1 for failing to meet requirements of California's Quality Education Investment Act. With a fund of $2.7 billion, QEIA is designed to help nearly 500 California schools shrink class size and improve teaching staff as a way to raise test scores.

With the state mired in a financial crisis that has slashed public school funding, QEIA has been viewed as a godsend by districts trying to improve student reading and math skills and raise graduation rates. Without the state windfall to hire and train more teachers, officials say, the schools will have to find the money elsewhere or simply do without.

"It's devastating to a school," said Bo Vitolo, who oversees QEIA programs throughout Southern California for the Los Angeles County Office of Education. "In this fiscal climate, it's really a challenge."

QEIA (which most officials pronounce KEE-ah) was created in 2006 to settle a legal battle between the California Teachers Association and then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, after he suspended funding for public schools.

A total of 488 California schools were selected to participate, including about 100 in Los Angeles Unified. The schools all scored in the lowest 20 percent on the state's Academic Performance Index test, and most are in poor and predominantly Latino neighborhoods.
QEIA: Who gets the money?
The 2006 Quality Education Investment Act provides $2.7 billion to participating schools that meet seven benchmarks designed to improve student achievement. They are:

-- Class-size reduction (20:1 in grades K-3; 27:1 in core classes in grades 4-12)
-- High school student to counselor ratio of 300:1.
-- Core classes taught by "highly qualified teachers," as defined by the federal No Child Left Behind Act.
-- Meet district targets for experienced teachers.
-- Ensure students have sufficient instructional materials and that schools are clean and safe.
-- One-third of teachers must participate in professional development.
-- Exceed API growth target, averaged over three years.

Source: California Department of Education.

Schools get money based on enrollment -- $500 for each student in kindergarten through third grade, $900 for grades 4-8 and $1,000 for each high schooler.

QEIA schools got three years to phase in seven performance benchmarks, which had to be fully implemented in 2010-11.

The student-teacher ratio for K-3 classes can be no larger than 20 to 1, for instance, although the district norm is 24 to 1. High schools must have a counselor for every 300 students, a ratio that may be as high as 600 to 1 at the average campus.

The most critical mandate requires schools to exceed their API growth target, based on a three-year average of its scores.

Three LAUSD high schools -- Jordan, Fremont and Manual Arts -- lost their funds in 2011-12, despite a three-year QEIA investment totaling $22 million.

Seven other high schools, along with four middle and five elementary schools will be terminated in 2012-13 for missing their API targets.

Those 16 schools received a total of $20 million for the current fiscal year. Had they been able to continue in the program through 2014-15, when QEIA is now set to expire, they would have raked in some $60 million.

Three of the middle schools on the list -- Carver, Gompers and Stevenson Middle schools -- are among those taken over by the Partnership for Los Angeles Schools, a reform movement organized by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Together, the three campuses received about $4.3 million this year. The loss to Stevenson was especially difficult since the school missed its API target by just one point.

"The schools were underserved and underperforming when we took over," said Marshall Tuck, the partnership's CEO. "We put in strong leadership, but we just couldn't move fast enough. It's absolutely heartbreaking."

LAUSD has 85 schools remaining in QEIA, including 14 in the San Fernando Valley. Among the noteworthy schools is Napa Elementary in Northridge, which raised 2011 API score by 130 points, the third-biggest jump in the district.

"It's important to say there has been some pretty magnificent improvement in some of our schools," said Donna Muncey, chief of LAUSD's Division of Intensive Support and Intervention.

Given the mixed results at QEIA schools, the state teachers union has hired an outside consultant to study the role of smaller class size and other factors on student achievement.

"We want to look at success beyond the test scores, at what is making a school successful," said CTA Vice President Eric Heins. "It's all part of a puzzle that fits together -- the teachers, the school administrator, the buy-in of parents and staff."

Ironically, QEIA was authored by Tom Torlakson, a former state senator who is now the superintendent of public instruction. His agency is now responsible for administering the law, which was passed in 2006, before the recession.

QEIA mandates that money taken from schools dropped from the program be used to help the others survive. While the law says schools can receive an annual cost-of-living increase, officials say the state's financial problems make that impossible. It's more likely, they say, that QEIA will simply be extended until the original $2.7 billion allocation is exhausted.

Local schools say they'd benefit more now from the additional state money -- especially with Gov. Jerry Brown threatening more budget cuts if voters reject his tax hike on the November ballot.

Reducing class size, especially in grades K-3, is becoming increasingly difficult and will be the next crisis facing QEIA schools, county and district officials say.

Deb Ernst, who oversees QEIA for LAUSD, said the program provides an additional incentive for polishing efforts that were already under way.

"There are many good things happening -- not just class size," she said. "There are many things that have to work together, that a dedicated principal has to do to leverage true increases in student achievement. QEIA doesn't hurt, but it isn't the primary lever."


••smf’s 2¢: The good news is that 85 LAUSD schools in QEIA DID meet the goals and did make a difference in the lives of students by investing the QEIA money well. The maybe even better news is that QEIA relies on class-size reduction to work – so now the data-driven and research-based can conclude that CSR is successful in LAUSD 85% of the time. Or they can ignore the evidence that doesn't support their agenda.

••2¢ more: Former boardmember David Tokofsky writes to 4LAKids:

Today's Daily News Front Page tells a lot but misses the point that the schools that lost the money were in fact almost entirely partnerships of one sort or another. (emphasis added)

LAUSD did not lose the money directly but only through the partners. …. $80 million plus [The $60MM this year and the $22MM last year] is a lot of money to lose compared to other initiatives especially since it was money already in poor kids classrooms.


SOME CUTS, SOME CASH IN BUDGET DEAL: No change in grade point eligibility for Cal Grant

By Kathryn Baron & John Fensterwald | Thoughts on Public Education http://bit.ly/MH2bQU

6/22/12 • Legislative leaders protected most student financial aid in the Cal Grants program and preserved status quo funding for charter schools in the budget deal announced yesterday between Democrats and Gov. Jerry Brown.

The agreement comes less than a week after legislators approved a $92 billion spending plan that eliminated some of the governor’s biggest education proposals, including his plan to switch the entire school finance system to a weighted student funding formula.

Few details were revealed from the agreement announced yesterday; Senate staff members said the specific language of the budget trailer bills would be written over the weekend and taken up in the budget committee on Monday. A floor vote could come as soon as Tuesday.

Staff confirmed that the bills would not raise the eligibility for Cal Grants, the $1.5 billion student aid program. Brown recommended raising the grade point average (GPA) required for the Cal Grant A program from 3.0 to 3.25, and increasing the GPA for Cal Grant B awards from 2.0 to 2.75.

Michele Siqueiros, executive director of the Campaign for College Opportunity and a board member on the California Student Aid Commission, said taking the GPA increases off the table is “absolutely a great thing for students,” because the proposal threatened to shift the core value of Cal Grants from a need-based scholarship into a merit-based program.

The Campaign for College Opportunity sent a letter to the governor last week opposing that and two other recommendations: reducing the Cal Grant award by 40 percent for new and continuing students attending independent nonprofit colleges in California, and linking Cal Grant eligibility to federal standards for the Pell Grant program. The budget deal reportedly contains neither of those proposals.

However, students attending private, for-profit colleges may want to check their schools’ graduation and loan default rates. The Legislature did accept Brown’s bid to crack down on so-called diploma mills, private for-profit institutions, by withholding Cal Grants from these schools for one year if their graduation rate falls below 30 percent or their student loan default rate is 15 percent or higher. That could affect more than 80 postsecondary institutions, according to an analysis conducted for the Student Aid Commission.

“It says to colleges, especially if they’re going to charge a lot of money, that students should be getting a lot of value for that money,” said Siqueiros, adding that means getting a job that pays enough to pay back the loan.

BROWN HAS CHARTER SCHOOLS’ BACKS

Brown has persuaded legislative leaders to restore an unexpected $50 million cut to charter schools that they approved in passing the state budget last week. The cut would have been $100 to $112 per charter student and would have widened a funding gap between charters and district schools.

But charter leaders will be holding their breath until the agreement is written into the language of a trailer bill and it becomes a done deal.

The money is for the block grant that charters get in lieu of small, restricted amounts of money for special purposes known as categorical programs. In his budget, Brown flat-funded the block program but included an additional $50 million to accommodate what the Department of Finance is projecting to be a 15.5 percent increase in charter school attendance next year, compared with less than 1 percent more in district schools.

The surge in enrollment reflects not only additional schools but also schools adding grades and more students per class to cope with budget cuts, said Jed Wallace, president and CEO of the California Charter Schools Association. Over the last four years, the average charter school has grown from 360 to 400 students.

Earlier this year, the Legislative Analyst’s Office calculated that charter schools received 7 percent or $395 per student less than district schools, including $150 per student less in categorical funding. That difference would have increased to $260 per student without the $50 million growth factor.

“Our members were very vocal about this,” Wallace said. “It looks as though funding will be restored, and we appreciate this.”

Brown, who was a creator of two charter schools while mayor of Oakland, has become a protector of charters as governor.


BUDGET CUTS DIMINISH EVALUATIONS OF TEACHER PREP PROGRAMS

By Tom Chorneau. SI&A Cabinet Report –http://bit.ly/NmXJFS

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 :: Site accreditation visits to 40 of the state’s teacher preparation programs will be put on hold for 2012-13 as the staff at the Commission on Teacher Credentialing takes a closer look at how institutional evaluations are done and what activities are actually needed.

The hold on site visits comes as the result of the grim funding forecast the commission faces next year. As one of the few state agencies completely self-funded, the CTC is struggling with a steep decline in revenues as the number of teacher applications and tests the agency administers has also fallen during the recession.

A 14-point response plan for revising the accreditation program for next year – approved by the commission last week – goes well beyond just suspending the site visits.

Also under review is the analysis of reports and reams of data that universities and preparation institutions submit in an effort to show that their teacher candidates are learning what they need to carry out instruction based on California standards.

“We believe the current system is robust,” said Teri Clark, director of the CTC’s Professional Services Division. “But the system may be a little overly intense for both institutions and commission staff. So we are going to look carefully to see which of these activities gives us good information and really need to be continued. And are there any activities that should be streamlined to reduce stress on the institutions and the commission especially if the activity is not giving the commission the assurances that the other activities are.”

In addition to its role as arbiter of discipline for educator misconduct cases in California, the commission also serves as the state standards board for teacher and administrator preparation – which includes oversight of college, university and other institutional training programs.

There are about 260 preparation programs in the state but some, like the California State University, includes a large number of separate pathway programs that all require individual review.

Currently, the commission has a seven-year evaluation cycle with preparation programs providing reports throughout that period. Candidate assessments are also reviewed to make sure the programs are testing for the right knowledge and skills. Finally, in year six, a team of experts –volunteers from within the same educational profession being evaluated – make a site visit to get a first-hand appreciation of the program.

Even with the volunteer support, site visits next year were estimated to cost the commission close to $160,000 – an expense the agency just cannot afford.

While they look for efficiency and innovation, the CTC staff plans to continue with the data collection and analysis and push back the site visit component one year.

Some employer groups, including the Association of California School Administrators, have warned the commission that the accreditation system is badly needed to ensure the quality of the work force, and that it should be careful when considering modification.

“We want to emphasize to everyone that this is only a one-year deferment of the site visits,” said Cheryl Hickey, Administrator of the CTC’s Professional Services Division, noting that there have been discussions in the past about cutting out the site visits completely and going only with a document review.

“But the panel that worked on this came to the conclusion that there are some things you just can’t get unless you are on the ground, talking to candidates, faculty, stakeholders and employers,” she said. “So we are very much aware that the site visit is a critical piece.”


••smf’s 2¢: One wonders how much of this is driven by LAUSD’s download of 110/591/600/604/over 8,000 allegations of teacher misconduct to the CTC – driven by LAUSD’s previous failures to report the same?


CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2012!

Themes in the News: A weekly commentary written by UCLA IDEA on the important issues in education as covered by the news media. | http://bit.ly/9k0ADx

06-22-2012 :: As the school year comes to a close, UCLA IDEA would like to congratulate all the graduates in California's high school class of 2012. Roughly 25,000 of these students have special cause for hope.

Last week, President Obama issued an executive order halting deportations for young undocumented immigrants. That decision, taken together with legislation signed by Gov. Brown last year allowing qualified undocumented students to access state financial aid, means that more outstanding California students will be able to enroll in and graduate from California's colleges and universities. And, because Obama's order also grants undocumented youth work permits, this expanded pool of college graduates will be able to make use of their degrees and contribute back to the larger community.

Young immigrant rights activists like Tam Tran and Cinthya Felix played a critical role in bringing us to this point. These DREAMers—so named for their support of the DREAM Act and their vision of a better future—spoke out and protested at great personal risk. In so doing, they changed public perception and transformed political reality.

The task of creating just and inclusive immigration policies is far from complete. Young people, including graduates from the class of 2012, will need to lead the way.


HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS & THE NEWS THAT DOESN'T FIT: The Rest (but not necessarily the best) of the Stories from Other Sources
Not the end of the world, just another tragedy in the litany: ADULT ED BAKING CLASS ENDS; WHO'LL BE TAKING THE CAKES? Culinary instructor Susan Holtz knew the dough-strapped district was losing more than just a popular adult education class. There was also a baker's legacy at stake
.By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times | http://lat.ms/MtFtLB

16 LAUSD SCHOOLS TO LOSE $60 MILLION IN STUDENT-ACHIEVEMENT FUNDS FOR FAILING TO MEET STANDARDS.: 3 out of 4 mid... http://bit.ly/MienbJ

FAMILIES RALLY IN EAGLE ROCK TO RESTORE AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAMS SLATED FOR ELIMINATION: By Vanessa Romo - Pass / F... http://bit.ly/Miep3k

CATALOGING GARCIA+DEASY’S FAILURES IN 140 CHARACTERS OR LESS: Sorry David, “F”s all around!: from twitter | http... http://bit.ly/MGR1t6

Save Afterschool Programs: EMERGENCY PRESS CONFERENCE THIS MORNING 10:30AM DAHLIA HEIGHTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL: by ... http://bit.ly/O4d04s

Special Report: LATINO PARENTS WITH AUTISTIC CHILDREN FACE MAJOR HURDLES: The series published on May 17th, 24th... http://bit.ly/LKzw0L

SIGNATURE COLLECTION UNDERWAY IN GARCIA RECALL: Summer break arrives, but recall proponents say their campaign i... http://bit.ly/MyaK23

YOU CAN HELP MAKE HISTORY FOR YOUR CHILD AND EVERY CHILD IN CALIFORNIA!: by email from the California State PTA ... http://bit.ly/MELBi8

Federal Study: CHARTERS + SPECIAL ED: by Diane Ravitch, from her blog has been UPDATED with LAUSD specific info | http://bit.ly/auDNT3

Federal Study: CHARTERS + SPECIAL ED: by Diane Ravitch, from her blog | http://bit.ly/NU5Tdy June 20, 2012 :: ... http://bit.ly/MClys6

wsj: CHARTER SCHOOLS FALL SHORT ON DISABLED: By STEPHANIE BANCHERO And CAROLINE PORTER, Wall Street Journal | ht... http://bit.ly/MvQUVc

THE GAO REPORT: CHARTER SCHOOLS - Additional Federal Attention Needed to Help Protect Access for Students with D... http://bit.ly/LHpOw7

DEMOTED ORVILLE WRIGHT M.S. PRINCIPAL ALLEGES RACIAL DISCRIMINATION BY LAUSD: Former Westchester middle school p... http://bit.ly/PAKlAW

A SODA BAN: L.A.(U.S.D) STYLE: A proposal by Councilman Mitchell Englander would end vending machine sales of su... http://bit.ly/Mxyt0C

Cutting 52% and “Restoring” 48% “Saves” Adult Ed: STATEMENT REGARDING THE RATIFICATION OF THE LABOR AGREEMENT BY... http://bit.ly/M7xwNv

BROWN, MUNGER/PTA + ONE OTHER TAX INITIATIVE QUALIFY FOR NOVEMBER BALLOT: There will be a total of 11 statewide ... http://bit.ly/M7uybM

BREAKING: 2 rival tax measures, one from @JerryBrownGov, the other from Molly Munger+PTA, both qualify for Nov CA ballot, says Secy of State

I am every politician’s nightmare – a supporter with no $! Please support my friend Eric Garcetti: He’s not Mayor Tony! http://bit.ly/donateEric

IS IT IT TOO EASY TO BE JOHN DEASY? Listen to him explain it all 4 you on KPCC 89.3 starting at 1pm Call in + turn up the heat: 866-893-5722

SUSPENDED CHARTER TEACHER CITES STUDENT TEST SCORES IN HIS DEFENSE: A teacher suspended from a Green Dot-run cha... http://bit.ly/NSxGw9

LAUSD’S INCREDIBLE SHRINKING SCHOOL YEAR: Patt Morrison for June 18, 2012 | 89.3 KPCC http://bit.ly/Kkx8rK LIST... http://bit.ly/NiUFy8

Retweet: @davidtokofsky: Where's the outrage over the severe cuts in our public schools?

LA UNIFIED CONDUCTS MASSIVE REORGANIZATION OF ITS MIDDLE MANAGEMENT + smf’s 2¢: By Tami Abdollah: Pass / Fail | ... http://bit.ly/N8MCAj

NEW FIGHT ON HEALTH EDUCATION AT LAUSD: HELP CHANGE THE MOU: email from: Edu Alert [edualerts@aol.com] Monda... http://bit.ly/LzRUt6

A.J. DUFFY IN EXILE: The former teachers union president misses his place at the education policy table.: LA ... http://bit.ly/MpFkcj

SUMNER REDSTONE SPONSORS ANTI-BULLYING TEXT LINE FOR L.A. SCHOOLS: By Meg James , LA Times, Company Town - Enter... http://bit.ly/MnKupe

AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS ELIMINATED FROM LAUSD BUDGET: 14,000 K-8 students will be forced to leave the school yard ... http://bit.ly/Mn7se4

CALIFORNIANS WANT TO INVEST MORE IN OUR LOCAL SCHOOLS, PTA SAYS: MEDIA ADVISORY June 15, 2012 ... http://bit.ly/Loof6a

ADULT EDUCATION’S EXISTENTIAL CRISIS + EdSource Report: AT RISK: Adult Schools in California: By Kathryn Baro... http://bit.ly/N5o4M6


EVENTS: Coming up next week...


*Dates and times subject to change. ________________________________________
• SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION BOND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE:
http://www.laschools.org/bond/
Phone: 213-241-5183
____________________________________________________
• LAUSD FACILITIES COMMUNITY OUTREACH CALENDAR:
http://www.laschools.org/happenings/
Phone: 213-241.8700


• LAUSD BOARD OF EDUCATION & COMMITTEES MEETING CALENDAR



What can YOU do?
• E-mail, call or write your school board member:
Tamar.Galatzan@lausd.net • 213-241-6386
Monica.Garcia@lausd.net • 213-241-6180
Bennett.Kayser@lausd.net • 213-241-5555
Marguerite.LaMotte@lausd.net • 213-241-6382
Nury.Martinez@lausd.net • 213-241-6388
Richard.Vladovic@lausd.net • 213-241-6385
Steve.Zimmer@lausd.net • 213-241-6387
...or your city councilperson, mayor, the governor, member of congress, senator - or the president. Tell them what you really think! • Find your state legislator based on your home address. Just go to: http://bit.ly/dqFdq2 • There are 26 mayors and five county supervisors representing jurisdictions within LAUSD, the mayor of LA can be reached at mayor@lacity.org • 213.978.0600
• Call or e-mail Governor Brown: 213-897-0322 e-mail: http://www.govmail.ca.gov/
• Open the dialogue. Write a letter to the editor. Circulate these thoughts. Talk to the principal and teachers at your local school.
• Speak with your friends, neighbors and coworkers. Stay on top of education issues. Don't take my word for it!
• Get involved at your neighborhood school. Join your PTA. Serve on a School Site Council. Be there for a child.
• If you are eligible to become a citizen, BECOME ONE.
• If you a a citizen, REGISTER TO VOTE.
• If you are registered, VOTE LIKE THE FUTURE DEPENDS ON IT. THEY DO!.


Who are your elected federal & state representatives? How do you contact them?




Scott Folsom is a parent leader in LAUSD and is Parent/Volunteer of the Year for 2010-11 for Los Angeles County. • He is Past President of Los Angeles Tenth District PTSA and represented PTA on the LAUSD Construction Bond Citizen's Oversight Committee for ten years. He is a Health Commissioner, Legislation Team member and a member of the Board of Managers of the California State PTA. He serves on numerous school district advisory and policy committees and has served as a PTA officer and governance council member at three LAUSD schools. He is the recipient of the UTLA/AFT 2009 "WHO" Gold Award for his support of education and public schools - an honor he hopes to someday deserve. • In this forum his opinions are his own and your opinions and feedback are invited. Quoted and/or cited content copyright © the original author and/or publisher. All other material copyright © 4LAKids.
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